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How to craft endrod
October 16, 2019 Books 4 comments

You can silence your phone with Do Not Disturb. This mode can mute sound, stop vibration, and block visual disturbances. You can pick what you block and what you allow.

Note: Some of these steps work only on Android 9 and up. Learn how to check your Android version.

Quickly turn interruptions off or back on

To turn Do Not Disturb on or off, swipe down from the top of your screen. Then tap Do Not Disturb .

Tip: If you have a Smart Display or speaker with the Google Assistant, you can ask it to silence your phone. Learn how to limit interruptions with Google Assistant.

Change your interruption settings

By default, Do Not Disturb stops most sound and vibration. You can pick how most types of interruptions act, like alarms, notifications, calls, and messages.

Set what to block

Important: Settings can vary by phone. For more info, contact your device manufacturer.

  1. Open your phone's Settings app.
  2. Tap Sound Do Not Disturb. If you see "Do Not Disturb preferences" instead, you're using an older Android version. See steps for Android 8.1 and below.
  3. Under "Behavior," choose what to block or allow.
    • Sound & vibration: Block or allow alarms, media, or touch sounds.
    • Notifications: Have no sounds from notifications, or no sounds and no visuals. Or pick custom options.
      Note: If you pick "Custom," you can customize what shows while your screen is on (like notification dots), and what happens while your screen is off (like blink light).

With any settings, critical notifications show. For example, you can't block system security notifications.

Set exceptions to allow

Important: Settings can vary by phone. For more info, contact your device manufacturer.

  1. Open your phone's Settings app.
  2. Tap Sound Do Not Disturb. If you see "Do Not Disturb preferences" instead, you're using an older Android version. See steps for Android 8.1 and below.
  3. Under "Exceptions," choose what to allow.
    • Calls:
      • To allow calls, tap Allow calls. Then pick whose calls get through: anyone, contacts only, or starred contacts only. To stop letting through calls, tap None.
      • To let a call through if the same person calls twice in 15 minutes, turn on Allow repeat callers.
    • Messages, events & reminders:
      • To allow messages, tap Allow messages. Then pick whose messages get through: anyone, contacts only, or starred contacts only. To stop letting through messages, tap None.
      • To allow reminders, turn on Allow reminders.
      • To allow events, turn on Allow events.

Stop interruptions automatically

At certain times

Important: Settings can vary by phone. For more info, contact your device manufacturer.

To automatically turn on Do Not Disturb at certain times, you can set time rules.

  1. Open your phone's Settings app.
  2. Tap Sound Do Not DisturbTurn on automatically. If you see "Do Not Disturb preferences" instead, you're using an older Android version. See steps for Android 8.1 and below.
  3. Tap a rule. Or, to make your own rule, tap Add rule  Time.
  4. Edit your rule's name, status, and alarm override.
  5. At the top, check that your rule is turned on.

To delete a rule, tap Delete .

During events & meetings

Important: Settings can vary by phone. For more info, contact your device manufacturer.

To automatically turn on Do Not Disturb during certain events on your Google Calendar, you can set event rules.

  1. Open your phone's Settings app.
  2. Tap Sound Do Not DisturbTurn on automatically. If you see "Do Not Disturb preferences" instead, you're using an older Android version. See steps for Android 8.1 and below.
  3. Tap Event. Or, to make your own rule, tap Add rule  Event.
  4. Edit your rule.
    1. Rule name: Name your rule.
    2. During events for: If you have multiple accounts with Google Calendar events, you can pick one.
    3. Where reply is: Your rule always applies to events where you've said "Yes." You can turn it on for events where you said "Maybe" or haven't yet replied.
  5. At the top, check that your rule is turned on.

To delete a rule, tap Delete .

If you're using Android 8.1 & below

Pick which interruptions to allow

Important: Settings can vary by phone. For more info, contact your device manufacturer.

Option 1: Total silence

To completely mute your phone so that it doesn't make sounds or vibrate, pick "Total silence."

  1. Swipe down from the top of your screen with 2 fingers.
  2. Under Do not disturb  or your current option, tap the Down arrow .
  3. Turn on Do not disturb.
  4. Tap Total silence.
  5. Pick how long you want this setting to last.
  6. Tap Done. You'll see Total silence . In "Total silence:"
    • Your alarms won't make noise.
    • Your device won't vibrate or make sounds when you get a call, message, or notification.
    • You won't hear sounds from music, videos, games, or other media.
    • During a phone call, you'll still be able to hear the other person.

Option 2: Alarms only

To mute your phone so that you'll still hear your alarms, pick "Alarms only." This won't mute sounds from music, videos, games, or other media.

  1. Swipe down from the top of your screen with 2 fingers.
  2. Under Do not disturb  or your current option, tap the Down arrow .
  3. Turn on Do not disturb.
  4. Tap Alarms only.
  5. Pick how long you want this setting to last.
  6. Tap Done. You'll see Alarms only .

Option 3: Priority notifications only

Automatically block interruptions

Important: Settings can vary by phone. For more info, contact your device manufacturer.

Option 1: Silence sounds during certain times

To automatically silence your phone during certain times, like at night, you can set time rules.

  1. Open your phone's Settings app.
  2. Tap Sound Do Not Disturb preferences.
  3. Under "Automatic rules," tap a rule, like Weeknight. Or, to make your own rule, tap Add more  Time rule.
  4. Edit your rule.
  5. At the top, check that your rule is turned on.

Option 2: Silence sounds during events & meetings

To automatically silence your phone during events or meetings, you can set event rules.

  1. Open your phone's Settings app.
  2. Tap Sound Do Not Disturb preferences.
  3. Under "Automatic rules:"
    • To edit the default rule, tap Event.
    • To make your own rule, tap Add more  Event rule.
  4. Edit your rule.
  5. At the top, check that your rule is turned on.

Option 3: Block visual disturbances

To prevent silenced notifications from visually interrupting you:

  1. Open your phone's Settings app.
  2. Tap Sound Do Not Disturb preferences Block visual disturbances.
  3. To prevent notifications from:
    • Showing over your screen while you're doing something else, turn on Block when screen is on.
    • Turning on the screen or pulsing the light, turn on Block when screen is off.
Turn interruptions back on

Important: Settings can vary by phone. For more info, contact your device manufacturer.

Turn off Do Not Disturb

To turn off "Do Not Disturb," either:

  • Swipe down from the top of the screen and tap your current option: Alarms only , Priority only , or Total silence .
  • Press the volume down button and tap Turn off now.

Override Do Not Disturb for certain apps

To allow notifications from certain apps:

  1. Open your phone's Settings app.
  2. Tap Apps & notifications.
  3. Tap the app. If you don't see it, tap See all apps or App info, and then tap the app.
  4. Tap App notifications.
  5. Turn on Override Do Not Disturb. If you don't see "Override Do Not Disturb," tap Additional settings in the app Notifications, then turn on Override Do Not Disturb.

Related articles

Want to open your links in Firefox by default? We'll show you how.

Check your Android version number: The instructions depend on your version of Android. You can find your version by opening your phone's Settings menu and tapping About (see your phone manufacturer's website for specific instructions).

Android 8 (Oreo)

  1. Tap the menu button (either below the screen on some devices or at the top-right corner of the browser), then (you may need to tap first).
  2. Tap .
  3. Tap Browser app and select Firefox from the available browsers.

To set Firefox as your default mobile web browser, first locate the Settings application on your phone either by navigating the apps screen or by using your phone's built-in search function. Once you have accessed your Settings, complete the following steps:

  1. Tap on Apps.
  2. Tap on the Firefox app tile.
  3. Under the subsection App Settings, tap on Browser app and select Firefox from the available browsers.

You're all set!

Older versions of Android

Step 1: Clear the current browser that opens links

  1. Open the Settings application and tap on Apps. (On some versions of Android this button is labelled "Applications" and you may have to tap on Manage applications before the next step.)
  2. Tap on the All tab.
  3. Tap on the current browser that opens links. This is usually the default browser which is called "Browser" or "Internet".
  4. Tap on Clear defaults to prevent this browser from opening links by default. If "Clear defaults" is greyed out, then either you have not installed another browser or you have installed another browser like Opera and it is set to be the default browser. If you have installed another browser, go back to the previous step and repeat with the default browser.

Step 2: Set Firefox to be the default browser for opening links

  1. Open a link in an Android application like the Mail application.
  2. Tap on Firefox and then tap on Always.

I upgraded to Android 10 and I can't make outgoing calls unless I restart my phone. Also I tried unsuccessfully to call someone from my recent.

SRP: Single Responsibility Principle

Single Responsibility Principle, as known as the S in SOLID, seems to be the easiest to understand among the other principles. But, instead of being that, it is the most violated.

When you read the definition you may think… “this thing should DO one and only one thing only” and then try to act in consequence. However, the SRP tells us that given a piece of code it should have one and only one reason to change.

You may be thinking what a “piece of code” exactly means in an Android application and there is not a single answer for that. SRP is applied to several levels:

Modules

I imagine you are still here because you are an Android developer and something in you (or in your project) kept you reading this article. I invite you to take a look at your app design, precisely your modules and to compare them with the image below.

This is a snapshot of an Android application with some modules. Let’s say that this app is about generating billings for a given company. A user can generate a bill, send it to the client, generate reports for the company and also generate reports to send to our clients with all the bills we made to them in a given period of time.

Whether you are satisfied or not with the number of modules, let’s assume this is the application design. Reviewing the modules in the app, we can see that there is a rest module which intends to handle all the things related to API communication. Why would you change something in this module? Probably if something related to the communication itself needs to be changed. You should avoid including other stuff in this module not related to the rest communication. Finally, the rest module has one and only one reason to change.

On the other hand, the common module seems to contain stuff related to all the other modules. This means that it has many reasons to change and violates the Single Responsibility Principle.

The company which this application belongs to has a new request for the developer team. They want to change something in the report the app delivers to the clients. We need to change the billing module to satisfy the company's requirements. This module also has the responsibility to handle generate and store the billings, as well as send reports to the company. Don’t you think it's doing more than one thing? What if a new need about the company’s report arrives. Would we have to change it again? Well… it surely has a lot of reasons to change.

Avoiding this kind of problem is a must if we want to have a scalable and maintainable application. The billing module does more than one thing and in consequence, has more than one reason to change. If we do correctly, splitting it into more modules could solve the problem.

A possible solution would be to extract two different modules for reporting. One from the client perspective and the other from the app owner (our client) perspective where every module consumes data from the billing module. In future updates, adding a column or modifying a row in a report won’t require any changes in other modules.

Make Firefox the default browser on Android

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Android Debug Database

Android Debug Database is a powerful library for debugging databases and shared preferences in Android applications

Android Debug Database allows you to view databases and shared preferences directly in your browser in a very simple way

What can Android Debug Database do?

  • See all the databases.
  • See all the data in the shared preferences used in your application.
  • Run any sql query on the given database to update and delete your data.
  • Directly edit the database values.
  • Directly edit the shared preferences.
  • Directly add a row in the database.
  • Directly add a key-value in the shared preferences.
  • Delete database rows and shared preferences.
  • Search in your data.
  • Sort data.
  • Download database.
  • Debug Room inMemory database.

All these features work without rooting your device -> No need of rooted device

Check out another awesome library for fast and simple networking in Android

Using Android Debug Database Library in your application

Add this to your app's build.gradle

debugImplementation 'com.amitshekhar.android:debug-db:1.0.6'

Using the Android Debug Database with encrypted database

debugImplementation 'com.amitshekhar.android:debug-db-encrypt:1.0.6'

Use so that it will only compile in your debug build and not in your release build.

That’s all, just start the application, you will see in the logcat an entry like follows :

  • D/DebugDB: Open http://XXX.XXX.X.XXX:8080 in your browser

  • You can also always get the debug address url from your code by calling the method

Now open the provided link in your browser.

Important:

  • Your Android phone and laptop should be connected to the same Network (Wifi or LAN).
  • If you are using it over usb, run

Note : If you want use different port other than 8080. In the app build.gradle file under buildTypes do the following change

debug { resValue("string", "PORT_NUMBER", "8081") }

You will see something like this :

Seeing values

Editing values

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A library for debugging android databases and shared preferences - Make Debugging Great Again - amitshekhariitbhu/Android-Debug-Database.

How to make an End Rod in Minecraft

End rods are decorative light sources that emit white particles.

Natural generation[edit]

End rods generate naturally all over end cities. They may spawn upright on the outside of towers, and they may spawn sideways inside of towers.

Obtaining[edit]

End rods can be obtained by any tool or block.

They will drop as an item when water or lava flows over it‌[Java Edition only].

Crafting[edit]

Usage[edit]

End rods are primarily used as light sources and decoration. They can be placed on any surface of any block, including other End rods. They will not break if their supporting block is broken. Gravity-affected blocks like sand or gravel will not break if they fall onto an End rod oriented vertically, but will break on a rod oriented horizontally. End rods can be pushed and pulled by pistons, no matter the orientation.

Inside some end city towers, they are positioned so the player may use them to climb the tower, similar to a spiral staircase.

Light[edit]

End rods emit a light level of 14 (same as torches), and will therefore melt snow layers and ice within a 2-block radius.

Sounds[edit]

Data values[edit]

Block data[edit]

In Bedrock Edition, end rods use the following data values:

DVDescription
0Facing down
1Facing up
2Facing north
3Facing south
4Facing west
5Facing east

Block states[edit]

Java Edition:

NameDefault valueAllowed valuesDescription
facing




The direction to the end rod, from the block it is attached to; also the direction the white end points.
Opposite from the direction the player faces when placing an end rod, and opposite from the purple end.

History[edit]

Issues[edit]

Issues relating to "End Rod" are maintained on the bug tracker. Report issues there.

Trivia[edit]

  • If placed on a mob's head using commands, end rods will rotate so that they look like the horn of a unicorn. They can also be placed on the player's head via the command.

Gallery[edit]

  • A naturally generated End rod.

See also[edit]

how to craft endrod

WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: How to Make an Android App for Beginners

As a way to make Android more accessible, Google developed Live Caption. Currently, Live Caption is only available on the new Pixel 4 and.

how to craft endrod
Written by Mikabar
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4 Comments
  • Shaktijora

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  • Garamar

    GaramarOctober 24, 2019 1:16 AM

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