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How to craft powerful spells lichdom battle mage
September 10, 2019 Carefree Crafting 1 comment

Of the numerous games that I’ve played that have come up through Steam’s Early Access program few have felt like they were actually finished games. The core gameplay is usually refined enough however they rarely feel like a cohesive whole, the rough edges of a just finished beta still rearing their ugly head. Sure they may have come a long way from where they were originally, and to those who’ve been involved with them for a long time they might feel a lot more polished, but all too often they feel like they still needed a bit more work before being unleashed on the world. Lichdom: Battlemage however is one of the rare examples where its Early Access stint was obviously well spent as the result title is just awesome.

You were just a simple blacksmith, one who enjoyed his craft and was good to his loving wife. However your life took a dark turn when one of the local nobles took exception to your refusal to sell him your wares, slaughtering your wife in front of you before knocking you out cold. When you came to though you weren’t in your shop, instead you’re out in the streets with a strange robed man hovering above you. His name is Roth and he has bestowed upon you a great gift: a pair of magical bracers that grant you control over some great power. It seems that, at least for the moment, your goals align as Roth wants you to take out the noble who wrong you however not for the reasons you’d first expect.

Interestingly Lichdom: Battlemage is built on CryEngine 3, the same engine that brought us the visual masterpieces that were Crysis 2 and Crysis 3. Whilst it’s not exactly up to the same level as those titles (few games are) Lichdom is still quite impressive in its own right. There were numerous scenes that just made me stop and admire the scenery. Combine this with just how ridiculous the effects can get when you’re using different spells on the vast hoards of enemies you’ll face and you’ve got a recipe for a game that never feels visually dull. It did stress my rig to its limits, with the graphics fan roaring into life on many occasions, but to Xaviant’s credit everything ran pretty smooth for the most part. I would like to see how Lichdom goes on a more modern rig as I’m sure it’d be incredible.

Lichdom: Battlemage’s core gameplay is probably best described as a fantasy take on the modern corridor shooter however the mechanics backing it up, which take inspiration from your more traditional RPG style game, add an incredible amount of depth. You start off with a couple basic spells but as you blast your way through the levels you’ll acquire new components which you can then use to craft different kinds of spells. Initially these start off as just better versions of the spells you already have however as you unlock more components and more spell types the kinds of effects you can create increase exponentially. So what starts out as a relatively simple concept, a mage with unlimited spammy power, quickly evolves into a deep game of mechanics, one where the more you explore mechanics the more awesome combos you find.

The combat itself is always fast paced, filled with dozens of effects, projectiles and enemies throwing themselves in your general direction. For the most part you’ll likely be able to get by spamming a single ability however if you want to do things efficiently you’ll need to make use of every different weapon in your arsenal. There are some elements of strategy, like taking out enemies that summon other enemies first, but for the most part you’ll be focused on blocking/dodging attacks and spamming out whatever ability you’ve chosen as your primary damage dealer. Of course your mileage may vary on this considerably as depending on which sigils you choose the strategies you’ll need to use will change dramatically.

There is a distinct lack of variety in the enemies you’ll face however. There’s the cultists, undead and demons and they’ll will pretty much be the same kinds of enemies no matter where you go, just with more health. Sure you’ll get the occasional buffed enemy that has some special attribute (like reflection, grrrrr) however after about 4 hours in Lichdom you’ll have seen every enemy you’ll face from then on out. The boss fights are, to their credit, unique and challenging but they’re so far apart that their uniqueness is often lost between long bouts of repetitive encounters. The numerous different types of spells go a fair way to alleviating this however I don’t feel it should be up to the player to provide their own variety, even if there’s a lot of it to be had.

The main source of enjoyment in Lichdom comes from the crafting system which has an incredible amount of depth to  it. You’ll collect spell types and augments throughout the game, all with quality levels derived from the traditional RPG style loot systems (common, uncommon, etc.). You can use these components directly or you can upgrade them to a higher tier of quality by sacrificing two other same quality level items. All of them also have a power level associated with them which determines how large the effect will be. Combine this with the 8 or so base sigils (fire, ice, lightning, etc.) and you have literally billions of possible combinations of different spells, effects and modifiers. Initially I found it mostly just a chore to sort through everything in order to get the spell I wanted but later on it became my main source of enjoyment.

I eventually settled on a combination of fire (damage dealer), ice (mastery application, basically a damage boost) and kinesis (because I got 2 unique spells for it). With this combination I was able to root large groups of enemies in place, cover them in mastery and then one shot enemies at my leisure. Before I switched to kinesis I was using lightning with a nova that had a 35% apocalyptical chance, enabling me to turn into a lightning god whenever I needed to and lay waste to large swaths of enemies. However the later build was much better for instagibbing enemies, something which you really need to do when 1 hit from them can take off a whole bar of your shield. I’m sure there’s hundreds of other viable combos out there though as I didn’t touch half of the sigils I unlocked.

The story is pretty rudimentary, giving your character enough motivation to go along with the plan that’s been laid out for him but lacking any kind of emotional connection. They did manage to get some top notch voice talent, Troy Baker (Joel, Last of Us) for the male dragon and Jennifer Hale (Femshep, Mass Effect), and whilst they do a great job it’s not their acting that’s the issue, it’s the incredibly light on story. Whilst it’s not exactly a huge flaw if you were looking for a good story then Lichdom will disappoint as it’s really only enough to keep the story moving forward.

Lichdom is pretty well polished with the only noticeable issues being things like the AI acting strange (often getting stuck on nothing or clipping through walls when they shouldn’t) or mechanics not working how you’d expect them to. I did have one major issue where my PC crashed during a longish session which corrupted my save game. However upon checking out the Steam forums I found that several people had the same issue and emailing my save game to Xaviant should get it fixed. 2 hours later I had an email back from them with my restored game files and recognition that they’re aware of the issue and working on a fix. Honestly I’ve never had that kind of response before so a big thumbs up to Xaviant for not only fixing my issue but also being incredibly responsive.

Lichdom: Battlemage is a game that, on first pass, appears to be a simple mindless game of spamming spells and collecting loot. However once you dig under the hood a little the incredible depth of the mechanics available to you becomes apparent and suddenly you’re playing a completely different game. There are a few issues that plague the experience, like the lack of variety of enemies and the so-so story, but otherwise Lichdom really does stand out as one of the better titles to play before the ramp up to bevy of titles that will be slamming us this holiday season.

Rating: 8.75/10

Lichdom: Battlemage is available on PC right now for $39.99. Total play time was 12 hours with 23% of the achievements unlocked.

The action-RPG Lichdom: Battlemage fared not too badly in our August review, but developer Xaviant has continued to work on it since. Today the studio announced the release of the game's first major patch, which adds a new "Smart Crafting Interface" designed to help new players successfully immerse themselves in the game's combat.

"Within each of Lichdom's eight magic schools—called Sigils—players can craft spells from components collected on the battlefield that focus their arcane arts in one of three areas: a targeted range attack, a defensive magical shield, and an area-of-effect spell," the review explains. "Inside each of these subgroups is an additional layer of specialization—destruction, control, and mastery... The various Sigils interact with each other in mysterious and surprising ways that reward experimentation and risk-taking."

It sounds intriguing, but also potentially intimidating. That's where the new Smart Crafting Interface comes into play: It will automatically upgrade spell components, craft new spells, and deconstruct old ones based on the equipment the player is currently using. The new interface prompts players to upgrade any eligible components when they access their inventory, and also shows which current spells can be improved; new spells may then be previewed and compared before the upgrade is completed.

The intent is to make the game more manageable for newcomers, but the studio said that experienced players are making good use of it too, writing, "We’ve found through testing that many veteran players appreciate this streamlined approach to inventory management that gets back into the thick of combat as quickly as possible." The interface also adds new tutorial videos explaining how Sigils worth with Attunements, and can be toggled on and off at will.

The patch features other changes, including to the pacing and composition of enemy encounters in the first act, the addition of a new Pitlurker boss to help players get a better handle on Mastery, better controller support, fixes to the UI and Necromancy Sigil, and various bug fixes and bits of polish. The substantial (6.4GB) update is live now on Steam; full details are up on the Xaviant forums.

Andy Chalk

As lead news writer during ‘merican hours, Andy covers the day-to-day events that keep PC gaming so interesting, exciting, and occasionally maddening. He’s fond of RPGs, FPSs, dungeons, Myst, and the glorious irony of his parents buying him a TRS-80 instead of an Atari so he wouldn't end up wasting his life on videogames.

In this game, you are a powerful mage with an unlimited arsenal of magic at your disposal, and you must get revenge, on Shax, the man who.

After your life is destroyed and you are left for dead by the malicious Count Shax, a sorcerer named Roth teaches you the ways of powerful magic and gives you the tools to seek your revenge. The setup is as cliché as it gets, but luckily there’s plenty of interesting gameplay in Lichdom: Battlemage. Think of a first-person combat game with customizable spells and the loot/boss structure of Diablo, and you have a good idea of what to expect.

The base level of difficulty is quite challenging, and players may struggle until they begin combining magic, leveling up base sigils, and crafting new spells. Thankfully you continue to grow in power and collecting loot even as you die over and over at the hands of the enemy swarms and bosses. There’s a bonus for staying alive as well; the more checkpoints you can get to without dying adds to the rarity of the loot you collect along the way. You’ll eventually come away with sacks of loot, all of which can be broken down for materials or applied directly to existing sigils to craft new and powerful magic.

Crafting is at the core of everything that happens in Lichdom, and you can either stick with the tried and true basic spells like targeted blasts and area-of-effect spells or move into far more interesting fare like the potent lob. The system is incredibly deep and should keep players concocting new things all the way into New Game Plus. If you’re looking to make some crazy spell mixes, optional challenge rooms are dotted around the world that provide a glut of quality materials.

In addition to your ever-growing arsenal of magic, players must use dodges and shields to get by. The basic form of protection is a timed maneuver; if you can time your block with an opponent’s attack you unleash a powerful retaliation with your active magic. More advanced shields and modifiers allow players to do all kinds of interesting things, like teleport and unleash strikes at the point of materialization.

Combat is smooth and responsive, but I found myself falling prey to “backpedal blasting” at several points throughout the game, simply retreating backward while chaining control and damage spells. It’s something everyone has done from time to time in first-person games while seeking cover, but it feels awkward and out of place here in light of the mostly frenetic combat.

Lichdom: Battlemage is an interesting and enjoyable take on first-person fantasy with lots of customization to dive into. I’m hoping this initial effort leads to an even more polished sequel for Xaviant down the line.

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Learn to craft awesome spells in Lichdom: Battlemage!

how to craft powerful spells lichdom battle mage

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Imagine if JK Rowling wrote her next novel on the side of a speeding lorry. Not while it was speeding, impressive as that would be, but imagine if, in some weird avant-garde experiment, she decided to pen Harry Potter and the Midlife Crisis on a plain white truck trailer and then drove it around the country for people to read as it passed. How long would you follow it, craning your neck out of the car window and squinting at the permanently markered words, before you decided it was no longer worth the trouble?

This bizarre thought bounced around my brain for at least half my time playing Lichdom: Battlemage - the same half wherein the game ceased to be capable of holding my attention. This is because Battlemage, developed by Xaviant Games, is a single, smartly crafted system deserving of a much better game to facilitate it. Although I appreciated the effort that has gone into realising the idea, there came a point where I grew exhausted from chasing after the bloody thing.

Battlemage (let's dispense with the silly "Lichdom" part, shall we?) is essentially a first-person shooter with spells. There are no swords, no bows, and none of the sneaking that you usually see in a fantasy game. Battlemage focuses purely on magic and mayhem. You assume the role of an initiate mage whose name and gender are yours to choose. Oddly, the game doesn't inform you gender is optional until after you've chosen your name, which led to me playing as a female mage called Marley.

The core gimmick in Battlemage is the ability for the player to craft their own spells via a system that is effective, if somewhat arcane in its implementation. Your basic abilities are divided between an attack spell, a defensive "nova" shield that issues a powerful counter-spell if timed correctly, an area-of-effect spell cast on the ground, and a short-range teleport for dodging enemy attacks. From this point, a spell can be defined by its sigil, such as fire, water or ice. Then you add a shape, so a targeted fire spell could take the form of a missile or a ray, while an AOE incantation might be defined as a trap or a pool. Lastly, the spell is augmented either for damage output, a controlling effect that obstructs or manipulates enemies, or a mastery effect that seems to lie somewhere between destruction and control.

It's a fun system to tinker with, especially once you've unlocked sufficient sigils to really zoom in on how your character approaches combat. For example, I created a "corruption" ray I would use to blanket-infect opponents with parasites, which upon their demise would unleash a swarm of insects that then attacked the other infected enemies, causing a chain reaction. Later, I crafted a "force pool" spell which pushed nearby enemies away from it, causing damage in the process. This proved particularly useful for casting on narrow ledges. Even the more routine fantasy spells you can create - your standard fireballs, freeze rays and lightning bolts - are lent a real weight and purpose by the CryEngine tech. In a tactile sense, Battlemage a very satisfying game.

That said, the system is hindered by a bunch of arbitrary limitations. Worst of these is that you can only level up three sigils at one time, and if you decide to move your levelling "focus" from one sigil to another, you lose all the progress made on the now-unfocused Sigil. In a game that is fundamentally about experimentation, punishing the player for doing just that makes about as much sense as giving a camel driving lessons.

Problems aside, there's a fair amount depth to this system; you can upgrade spell components by combining them with two additional components or break a redundant spell down into its component parts. Unfortunately, exploring it in any greater depth would be a waste of words, because the surrounding game simply isn't very enjoyable at all.

Battlemage sets its spell-slinging action in a series of linear levels ranging from crumbling catacombs to frosty forests to arid deserts. There's some impressive environmental artistry on show. One particularly memorable sight is a gigantic frozen maelstrom, the icy walls of which are dotted with the wrecked hulls of battling warships caught in the moment of the flash-freeze.

The trouble is, it's little more than wallpaper. The actual level design consists of cramped linear corridors that funnel the player to the objective like a theme park ride. All the interesting areas are beyond your reach. There's a point halfway through the game where the story takes you through an enormous battlefield lined with army tents and siege engines, but it's all blocked off by a giant green force-field. I found myself pressing my nose against those spectral walls like a Victorian guttersnipe at a sweetshop window, yearning to venture past that barrier and sample the delights within.

And these are long corridors. You're looking at around 20 hours of game here, which would be fine if those hours were consistently engaging. But Battlemage lays out its action in a horribly formatted way. You'll fight a wave of enemies, activate a "memory" cut-scene that dishes out a little plot exposition, have a chat with your "Pathfinder" companion - a laughable concept in such a linear game - who divulges a little more exposition alongside a snarky comment or two. Then you fight another wave of enemies. Repeat this 20 times before fighting an end-of-level boss, then do the exact same thing again in a new environment.

This assembly-line structure, combined with the uninspired and tediously distended level design, destroys any sense of surprise or wonder you might get from either the environments or the story. Not that the story is particularly great - another example of a developer spending goodness knows how much money on designing pretty skyboxes before handing scriptwriting duties to the man who replenishes the coffee dispenser. In this instance, Mike from CafVendor might just have a literary career ahead of him provided he takes a writing course or two, having turned in a fairly inoffensive effort that does a few clever things with the concept of the "Chosen One". But too much of the action happens off-screen, with the Pathfinder and the memory rifts relating most of the information to you second-hand.

I would stop there, but sadly, Battlemage makes a bunch of smaller yet no less grating mistakes: errors that were inducted into the FPS Hall of Shame years ago. These are so numerous that it would take another thousand words to criticise them in detail, so instead I'm just going list the worst of them and give you a link to the "incorrect answer" buzzer from the game show Family Fortunes, which you may play each time you read one. Got your buzzer ready? OK, here we go.

  • Flying enemies
  • Enemies that spawn other enemies until killed
  • Enemies with attacks that freeze you in place
  • No graphical customisation options beyond low/med/high
  • No adjustable difficulty
  • Checkpoint saves that are irregularly spaced
  • Checkpoint saves that are spaced too far apart
  • Checkpoint saves that are placed before cut-scenes

I think Xaviant Games may be going home before the Big Money.

Facetiousness aside, these issues only add to the disappointment; the real problem is the bloated and repetitive structure. A cynic might infer that this is to justify that hefty �40 price-tag. Either way, Battlemage could be half as long and twice as good if Xaviant had spent their budget creating interesting scenarios. It's a bit depressing, because I like the spellcrafting; I like the combat system; I like the fantasy setting, which reminds me of Dark Messiah: Might and Magic, one of my favourite games. Xaviant is clearly a talented crew, and it's disheartening to see that talent corralled in such an uninspired way.

I find myself thinking back to a Gabe Newell quote from the book Half Life 2: Raising the Bar, regarding the game's large portions of missing content. "It doesn't matter what we cut, so long as we cut it and it gives us the time to focus on other things." I feel like this outlook is more pertinent than ever; there are too many games being released these days for them to waste players' time in the way Battlemage does. Editing in game design is as important as it is in writing or filmmaking. Get to the point. Respect both the time and financial investment of your audience. Above all else, don't send me chasing after the goddamn lorry.

Battlemage focuses purely on magic and mayhem. The core gimmick in Battlemage is the ability for the player to craft their own spells via a.

Lichdom: Battlemage kaufen

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ok, i was at a complete loss of what i could do in this game cause it didn't seem to really explain anything... i still have my default fire and ice spells.

eventually, the game alerted me on how to go into my journal, which had quite a bit of information for me... so i read it all.

i still find myself confused, though...

i keep seeing stuff about spell components, and going into the inventory, it occasionally mentions fusing components to upgrade them... i don't know what that is, but i've just been doing it cause i am tired of seeing the message pop up every time i go into the inventory.

the game also frequently has me "crafting improvements" for the spells i have... it doesn't really seem like it's improving anything, though... i see no difference.

then sometimes it says i completed a fire "goal" and asks me to upgrade either... damage, critical boost, or some other third thing... i just upgraded my fire's damage both times... which seems to be such an insignificant amount, it hardly matters.

i have yet to get even one of those "goal" things for my ice spells... cause my ice spells are useless, they don't do anything.

it also mentioned a blink ability... which i have no clue on how to do... i think the journal touched on it... but it mentioned different shield types and... i just got lost.

both inventory types seem to work SO differently... i can only "improve" my spells and fuse/upgrade components in the smart inventory... but i can only use the craft and synthesis menus in the custom inventory... again, confusing.

i look at the stuff in my synthesis menu... it shows "pool", "mastery", "destruction", and several other things that i seem to collect from these echoes, little glowing jar things... and big... ugly... throbbing things hanging on the ceilings of areas.

i also destroyed this undead-creating... thing... that some "gryphon" girl pointed out to me... which gave me a TON of these things.

but, what i am so confused and worried about is... crafting and synthesis seem like things i don't want to mess around with, cause... i can permanently lose stuff, screw up my spells, and apparently deconstruct/destroy my spells... i have no clue how to use these menus and the spellcrafting without screwing myself over big time.

are there a limited number of these things in the game... if i screw around too much with trying to craft spells, and end up losing all these things, will i never be able to craft spells again?

or are there an unlimited amount, can i farm these things as often as i want to create as many spells as i could ever want?

i just... have NO clue how this game really works.

it is... BY FAR... the most confusing game i have ever played.

how does anyone just jump into this game and get the hang of it?

"What is better - to be born good, or to overcome your evil nature through great effort?" - Paarthurnax

Yeah, the crafting is designed poorly, I guess it hasn't changed at all since the pc version.

Psn: Hareofdoom
Legend Edgemaster of the Unicorn

Later in the game you can fast travel between save points. Enemies will respawn if you go back to an old location. That way you can get more components for your spells. You won't ever run out. Most of the time you'll have more than you know what to do with.

The "spell upgrades" in the simple inventory are the same as crafting your own spells. The game is just choosing the components for you. Go to the full inventory and make a few spells yourself. After you make a few you'll see what types of components affect which values on the finished spell.

The Shape (Pool, Ray, Trap, etc) is what type of spell you're making. Do you wanna make an AoE that does all its damage at once or deal damage over time? Pool is a DoT and Area deals it all at once.

As I've suggested before, go watch the Sigil videos on YouTube. They're only a couple minutes long. The narrator of the video explains what is happening during the spell crafting process.

XBL GT: LazarusNecrosis
Currently Playing: Fallout 4, Just Cause 3, Diablo 3: UEE, Dishonored

LazarusNecrosis posted...
Later in the game you can fast travel between save points. Enemies will respawn if you go back to an old location. That way you can get more components for your spells. You won't ever run out. Most of the time you'll have more than you know what to do with.

The "spell upgrades" in the simple inventory are the same as crafting your own spells. The game is just choosing the components for you. Go to the full inventory and make a few spells yourself. After you make a few you'll see what types of components affect which values on the finished spell.

The Shape (Pool, Ray, Trap, etc) is what type of spell you're making. Do you wanna make an AoE that does all its damage at once or deal damage over time? Pool is a DoT and Area deals it all at once.

As I've suggested before, go watch the Sigil videos on YouTube. They're only a couple minutes long. The narrator of the video explains what is happening during the spell crafting process.


damage all at once sounds better than slowly spreading it out over time... unless there is something i'm missing there.

what am i supposed to search for... just... "sigil videos"? or what?

"What is better - to be born good, or to overcome your evil nature through great effort?" - Paarthurnax

https://youtu.be/cHeoNXtbrqk

This is the one for fire. Just change the word fire to the other sigil types.

Pools have their uses. I use an Ice Control Pool and lead my targets into it. It freezes anything that walks into it. A single area shot would only freeze the ones standing there when I fired it. I can hit 2 or 3 with a pool, then lead others into it by standing behind it. For damage, all at once is usually best, but once you get the hang of using Control and Mastery, Pools can help to hit more targets in a single cast.

XBL GT: LazarusNecrosis
Currently Playing: Fallout 4, Just Cause 3, Diablo 3: UEE, Dishonored

uh... ok, i watched that video... but i don't see what i'm supposed to learn from it?

the person just slapped some stuff together without really explaining any of it, and showed off a simple fireball and an AoE blast, which... i already have.

you START with a fireball, AoE blast, and a shield... so, i don't really get what the person did. :/

i recall hearing you can "craft thousands of spells" in this game... but for all the stuff that person threw together in the crafting menu there... they just ended up with the same stuff you start out with.

by... "crafting thousands of spells"... do they mean just slightly altering some numbers or something... but essentially have the same three forms of spells, no matter what?

i was thinking it'd be more like magicka when it came to crafting new spells and creating new effects, from how it sounded.

"What is better - to be born good, or to overcome your evil nature through great effort?" - Paarthurnax

ZeroJinKui, I feel ya. Was unsure about the game, took a chance now the patch came out and I like the game. Only the spell crafting is so damn confusing...

PlayStation Network ID: Leon_Loire
XBOX Live Gamer Tag: Leon Loire

ZeroJinKui posted...
uh... ok, i watched that video... but i don't see what i'm supposed to learn from it?

the person just slapped some stuff together without really explaining any of it, and showed off a simple fireball and an AoE blast, which... i already have.

you START with a fireball, AoE blast, and a shield... so, i don't really get what the person did. :/

i recall hearing you can "craft thousands of spells" in this game... but for all the stuff that person threw together in the crafting menu there... they just ended up with the same stuff you start out with.

by... "crafting thousands of spells"... do they mean just slightly altering some numbers or something... but essentially have the same three forms of spells, no matter what?

i was thinking it'd be more like magicka when it came to crafting new spells and creating new effects, from how it sounded.

Basically, yes. However, the shapes and attunements affect how those spells function. A fire>missile>destruction will always cast a fireball, but replace missile with ray and get a beam that shoots out of your hands constantly but won't charge and gets interrupted when you get hit. Control makes things control (delirium converts enemies, for example), and mastery increases damage done on the next hit. Lob lets you throw a grenade, but I believe you have to aim it manually. Same with rays. Shields and AoE spells have three shapes each, too, while novae are always novae. Attunement becomes critical for customizing your play style, though.

"You know how some people don't have hands? Well, I don't have a mother."
"Oh, you were born without one?"

well, i definitely need to change my ice beam into a blast or something... i can't even level up my ice sigil because i can't harm anything with it.

i guess i'll just mess with stuff and see what happens...

seeing some of the different sigils, though... i certainly hope things get a little more interesting later on.

necromancy better not function the same as fire/ice/lightning... with blasts and beams.

i expect summons and raising of the dead... otherwise, they may as well have just limited it to those basic elements.

"What is better - to be born good, or to overcome your evil nature through great effort?" - Paarthurnax

Ice>ray>control fires a beam that freezes things. Damage attunements actually inflict damage. I believe shattering frozen enemies counts for kills, but I don't know about damage requirements. Be warned, however, that damage attunements almost always deal ONLY with damage. They might do it differently, but they usually don't cause status effects. Exceptions I can think of are Delirium and Necromancy.

Also, the only way to change shapes and attunements is to go into Custom Inventory. Smart Inventory will find the best stats for the same shape and attunement as the spell you're upgrading.

Necromancy tags things. When they die, they turn get replaced by an allied skeleton. You can't still deal damage and change the delivery, though.

"You know how some people don't have hands? Well, I don't have a mother."
"Oh, you were born without one?"

how to craft powerful spells lichdom battle mage

Find out the best tips and tricks for unlocking all the trophies for Lichdom: Battlemage in the most Your sigils are the elemental bases of your spells. You will.

how to craft powerful spells lichdom battle mage
Written by Kajikinos
1 Comment
  • Kajim

    KajimSeptember 19, 2019 11:36 AM

    You commit an error. Write to me in PM, we will talk.

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