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How to setup power cables for industrial craft

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How to setup power cables for industrial craft
August 13, 2019 Carefree Crafting 1 comment

Special thanks to Kingy24
Updated to v6.80 by Talonius

Outdated Content: This information is outdated and does not apply to the current version of ICĀ².


WARNING This tutorial is currently being updated to IC2 and may contain incorrect information.


Forum post about IC2 Wiring by Alblaka: forum.industrial-craft.net


Firstly, Cables do not act like redstone; you cannot place them diagonally to travel in a stair formation. They must be placed like stairs.

Most machines will accept power from a wire on all 6 sides, but you (usually) only need one input.


Generators will output power from all 6 sides(but only from one side at any one time), however don't cover the top of a Solar Panel, for obvious reasons.


Starting simple this is the most basic set up without omitting a BatBox. The max insulated cable length for copper is achieved here. The cable is 4 blocks long. Does not apply to latest versions of IC2 Experimental (v2.2.x)


This setup will not work as the BatBox is not a splitter and it doesn't have two outputs, it will accept input from 5 sides at the same time but will only output on the output face marked with dot.


This is a simple buffer, it can be used to store EU for use without running the generator


This is a simple 2x solar flower setup with a loop. This will enable you to spread EU around your Factory and not have it bottleneck in any particular spot. Take note the BatBox connecting the generators to the loop. that way the EU will be evenly distributed around the area. In the center of the solar flower there is a wire, a normal,average wire.(because of advances in the programing of the wires they now allow to be connected up to 6 sides simultaneously opposed to the 3 side max in IC.)


Now for something more advanced, the MFE. This is an example of an improper setup of an MFE before I turn off the redstone as shown in the second picture


and after I placed the 2 wires above the MFE will output one 128 EU packet and everything crispifies. (Latest IC2 Experimental versions do not do this)


this caused a loop of power to be sent from the top of the MFE(output) back into the batBox hence killing the setup.(and wasting the wire because it couldnt handle the power and just melted) To properly use a MFE, you need to use a Low Voltage Transformer and gold or better wire. the MFE is used to scale the voltage up and the Low voltage transformer to scale it back down. Quite similar to real life and your local power grid.doing this increases the range of the power but needs a better Cable. The energy loss is less because you are sending less packets that are larger, they still lose EU over the cable but you lose less.


Next is series of machines, and current splitting. You can have your machines in a row and power them from one MFE the excess is sent back to the MFE and stored. In this setup I have the maximum cable length without loss (to prevent continuous loss of power) and the measurements listed are from right to left and the last one receiving 0 EU. the Eu splits evenly between each machine as it acts like a cable end.


and this is with an MFE output of 128EUs


as you can see it is useless to make lines of machines any longer than 5 and 4 would be optimal as the last 2 would receive 8/2 = 4 EU each, which will power most common machines easily. You could use the 50 EU output if you wanted to power say 4 crystal chargers in a row.

You can then save space and stack your machines in a feasible 3x4 array like so.


and the back to power them


Next up is Miners and making them do what you want them to. In the first setup I have a solar flower powering a MFE => HVT => HVT => Miner. This is a one way operation, but the miner can only accept so much EU at a time therefore the 2000 EU sent towards the miner will sometimes be rejected and get sent back. causing loss each way. This can happen as often as once each frame causing massive power loss.


A better way to do it is using Switch Cables. these accept input on all sides but the bottom, (which is the output). However if you apply Redstone current it will make the top output and the bottom input. This can be used as a switch before sending Eu from the MFE =>HVT. This way you can shut the whole operation down and let the MFEs charge up.

The miner can be set up to automate with water streams as well. however I use Feanorith's Mine Factory Mod that lets you build a conveyor. This is easier then digging trenches and placing water buckets. It also can travel ridiculously long lengths, and never have to dig one block down. This is similar to water running on iceblocks (if you can craft em)


Take note that I have all but one of the 5 available sides of the miner covered as to direct the item toward the conveyor, and a small 3 long wall to stop the items from being shot over the conveyor.

Electrical Engineering 101: Power & Electricity contains information about the Industrial Craft mod.
Electrical Engineering 101: Power & Electricity is a Tutorial.

"Reproduced with permission from SimpleGuy with proper citation. SimpleGuy reserves the exclusive right to make derivative works. Public reproduction of this guide anywhere else besides techicpack.wikia.com, in full or in part, requires permission from SimpleGuy. SimpleGuy is not responsible for keeping this reproduction of the guide up to date. To contact SimpleGuy or view the original work, please visit the original guide on the Technic Forums. Please read the rules if you wish to register."

Version: Slowly Becoming Colorblind Friendly Edition!
Last Updated: 2/26/2012

A Few Opening WordsEdit

This is currently a work in progress. Please leave feedback. You may ask "SimpleGuy, why do you start with Power Transport of all things!?" Answer: It's probably the most difficult concept to understand within IC2power generation, so if you can understand it you can look up recipes of machines yourself and figure everything else out (of course reading the rest of the guide is highly recommended). Plus if you don't know about Power Transport, it can really mess you up badly ("messy" being from "nothing working" to BOOM!). Just a note that all pictures used are my own.

Please let me know if you wish to reproduce parts of this guide elsewhere. Without my stamp of approval (which I'll give generously), I have to assume you're stealing my words and trying to pass off this work as your own.

Power Transport (IndustrialCraft 2)Edit

I connected everything but my electricity won't flow!Edit

In IndustrialCraft 2, you'll have power generators and places/things you want to power. How that power gets itself from the generation point to where you want to use it is the focus of this Section, and it is probably one of the most important. Unfortunately, there's not a lot of pictures for where we are starting, so be prepared for a long read. So let's get on with it already.

The EUEdit

An "energy unit" or EU is the default energy system for IndustrialCraft 2 items, and is necessary to run machines, charge items or armor, or electrocute people. It is often useful to measure the rate at which EU flows, and in Minecraft the unit of game time is called a "tick". If a game is running at full speed there are about 20 game ticks in a real-life second. Thus, when talking about rates of EU moving, being used, or being generated, it is always referred to as "EU/t" or "energy unit per tick".

However, that's not all there is to EU. Machines, whether generating the EU or using the EU, and cables (when transporting EU) utilize EU in packets. That is, let's take a hypothetical generator that generates 32 EU every tick. That EU is assigned one packet of 32 EU. Packets are hardly mentioned elsewhere, but are really the main "core" of IC2 electricity.

The reason packets are so important has to do with the way machines accept packets of energy. Lots of machines are listed on various sites as accepting of 32 EU/t energy when in use. What they don't tell you is that these machines really can accept only up to 32 EU-sized packets. That means, you can give that machine two packets of 20 EU, and it will be able to accept both of them to gain 40 EU. It can only use 32 EU per tick, so within one tick:

  • The machine gains two 20 EU packets for 40 EU
  • The machine uses 32 EU, with 8 EU left over
  • The tick ends, and the remaining EU left over disappears (unless it is capable of storage)

So using packets makes life a lot more complicated. To help clarify, in the future I will use the following notation:

  • [number] pEU by definition is "[number]-sized packets of EU". So 2 pEU is one packet of 2 EU
  • [number] EU by definition is "[number] of EU". So packet size is not specified.

In IC2, machines are capable of accepting an infinite number of packets. However, if even one of those packets exceeds their limit then there will be violent consequences.

Here are the general rules about packets, when looking at wikis:

  • A generator, when producing X EU/t, produces one packet with size X EU.
  • Any machine that accepts EU/t accepts any number of packets per tick, but all packets must be smaller or equal to in size what a machine accepts in EU/t. If even one is greater, the machine explodes. This machine could store EU or use EU to accomplish a task.

When I give you problems, I will use the notation of EU/t when describing generators. It is up to you to realize this means only one packet of that amount of EU in one Minecraft tick. However, in appendices and data tables I will correctly reference input and output size as pEU.

So when building a EU distribution network, we have to keep both our overall energy movement in mind and how we deliver them. We don't want our overall energy (EU) to go to waste, as it is a waste of perfectly good energy! We also don't want to deliver incorrect packets (pEU), as the consequences can either be EU waste or destruction of materials!

Sample Problem #1: You have a hypothetical generator that produces 64 EU/t, according to a wiki page. Magically, that electricity is transferred to a place where it can be stored with no loss in EU/t. The particular storage unit says it only accepts 32 EU/t on a wiki page. Will the generator blow up the storage unit, or will the storage unit accept the EU peacefully? Would the storage unit accept the EU if we instead replaced the one generator with two generators that produce 32 EU/t?

Sample Problem #2: Convert the following into total EU:
a) two 64 pEU
b) 128 pEU
c) 32 EU
Convert the following into pEU:
d) 32 EU
e) 64 EU in eight packets
f) 256 EU in one packet
Find the number of packets:
g) 128 EU in 32 pEU
h) 64 pEU
i) 32 EU

CablesEdit

Surprise, cables are how we transfer power between machines in IC2! Through a thorough understanding of their use, you should be able to distribute your power in an incredibly efficient manner possible. With your newfound knowledge of the pEU, EU and their "per tick" variants you should be OK. And there are even pictures! Let me be clear and say that when measuring distances, I may say "1 meter" or "1 block" or "1 block length", but all of these are equivalent to the dimension of the side of exactly 1 block in minecraft. So please don't get confused.

First, the most important thing to remember in Minecraft is, that like in the real world, cables are not perfect and not created equally! Different cables will lose energy per packet at different, but set, rates. This 1 EU loss in a distance is known as energy dissipation, and it happens in discrete amounts. That is, if you fall short of the distance that an EU would dissipate, none dissipate! The following picture shows the length of the wire needed to lose at least 1 EU/t within each packet travelling along the wire. Also, notice how cables are able to be insulated, and even doubly insulated. Note that not all wires can be insulated, and not all can be insulated to the same degree.

From left to right the cables are: Ultra-Low Current cables , Copper cables , Gold cables , High-Voltage cables , and Glass Fibrecables. From bottom to top the cables are: Uninsulated, 1x Insulated, 2x Insulated, 4x Insulated

As you can clearly see, different wires lose different EU/t per packet at different lengths. Furthermore, each cable is not able to carry equal sized pEU/t within them, although every cable can carry an infinite (theoretically) number of packets per tick. This next image shows the maximum size of packets of EU (pEU) each wire can carry, and each wire is 5 meters tall.

From left to right the cables are: (Same as previous image) Ultra-Low Current cables, Copper cables, Gold cables, High-Voltage cables, and Glass Fibre cables. Colors of Wool: Red = 1 pEU. Yellow = 10 pEU. Green = 100 pEU.

So, what you should see between these to pictures are the following:

  • Insulation has no effect on the pEU each the cable can carry, only the amount of energy dissipation over a distance.
  • In general, the lower the pEU capacity of the wire, the longer it is able to be without energy dissipation.

However, these are merely pictures to give you an appreciation for the relative amount each can handle. For exact numbers here is the table for exactly how many lengths of wire it takes to lose 1 EU in each packet, and the maximum pEU capacity of the wire:

Ultra-Low Current Copper Gold High-Voltage Glass Fibre
Maximum pEU 5 32 128 2048 512
Insulation Strength \ pEU Loss
Uninsulated 1 every 40 blocks 1 every 3.33 blocks 1 every 2 blocks 1 every block 1 every 40 blocks
1x Insulated N/A 1 every 5 blocks 1 every 2.22 blocks 1 every 1.05 blocks N/A
2x Insulated N/A N/A 1 every 2.5 blocks 1 every 1.11 blocks N/A
4x Insulated N/A N/A N/A 1 every 1.25 blocks N/A

So why is this important? Well, let's suppose you have a 1 EU/t generator and you want to link it to a machine with 61 blocks between. Guess what, no matter what cable you use, the 1 EU/t will dissipate before it reaches your machine! In fact, you could have an infinite number of 1 EU/t generators 61 blocks away from where you want the power to be, and you still won't gain any energy. There would be an infinite number of 1 pEU travelling in whatever wire you chose, and at the 41st block of cable, every packet would have lost 1 EU, becoming 0 EU packets, or effectively disappearing.

Let me illustrate overcoming this problem by supposing you only had one temporary storage machine to use. One way to overcome this dissipation problem is by breaking up the distance by putting it exactly in the middle (creating two lengths of wires, each 30 blocks in length). Thus, if you use Ultra-Low Current cable or Glass Fibre Cable, the packets would be preserved in each 30-block length wire segments, assuming that the storage machine outputs 1 pEU.

The other way to overcome this problem is by brute force. Let's assume for a second that your temporary storage machine only outputs a gigantic 2000 pEU. Let's put it right by the generators, so that there's no EU loss between generators and this storage machine, but the storage machine is still 60 blocks away from your goal. So after your generators feed it 2000 EU, it will spit out one packet of 2000 pEU. Let's say you're using uninsulated High-Voltage Cable, which is the only cable that can handle such huge packets, but loses 1 EU every block. That means, losing 1 EU per block, the packet will arrive at its destination with one 1940 pEU, for a net gain of 1940 EU. So instead of producing 2000 EU and losing it all in 1 pEU, you are producing 2000 EU and delivering a 1940 pEU! So while the higher rates of dissipation for the larger pEU cables may seem discouraging, it may be effective at delivering power great distances.

% Cable EfficiencyEdit

Bottom line, To figure out how % efficient a wire choice would be, you only need to know the distance at which you need to go from Point A to Point B. Next, you merely choose a wire to check the efficiency of, get its dissipation rate & maximum packet size from the table above, and plug it into the equation below: Code: [Select] 100 * [1 - TRUNCATE{Total Distance / Cable Distance Efficiency} / (Maximum Cable Packet Size)] = % Cable Efficiency

Derivation of above equation if you are curious. Code: [Select] 100 * (Total EU Produced - Total EU Dissipated)/Total EU Produced = % Cable Efficiency

100 * [1 - (Total EU Dissipated/Total EU Produced)] = % Cable Efficiency Total EU Dissipated = TRUNCATE{Total Distance/Cable Efficiency} * Number Packets Number Packets = Total EU Produced /Max Cable Size Total EU Dissipated = TRUNCATE{Total Distance/Cable Efficiency} * (Total EU Produced/Max Cable Size) 100 * [1 - <TRUNCATE{Total Distance/Cable Efficiency} * (Total EU Produced/Max Cable Size)>/Total EU Produced] = % Cable Efficiency 100 * [1 - TRUNCATE{Total Distance / Cable Distance Efficiency} / (Maximum Cable Packet Size)] = % Cable Efficiency

Example: Let's say I got to transfer power 120 Blocks. Using the equation above, these are my efficiencies for the most insulated wires of each type:

  • Ultra-Low Current: 40%
  • 1x Insulated Copper: 25%
  • 2x Insulated Gold: 62.5%
  • 4x Insulated High-Voltage: 95.3125%
  • Glass Fibre: 99.414%

Below are graphs of how efficient a cable is vs the distance in terms of block distance. This first one gives you an overall view of efficiencies:

This one should illustrate how cable efficiency operates in short distances (less than 50 blocks):

Note that while it seems that 1x insulated copper cables are outclassed by every other cable, they deliver a packet size most beginning & intermediate machines need in order to fully function.

Notice that Glass Fibre cables tend to break the trend for pEU dissipation that is seen in other cables. This is not a mistake. Glass Fibre cable is very expensive, as it costs one diamond to make 6 at the most. Even so, it cannot handle the largest pEU.

Sample Problem #1: This problem assumes you have no glass fibre cable available to you. If a generator is outputting 32 EU/t, and you are using 2x insulated gold cable to transport it 80 blocks away to a storage unit, how many EU/t is the storage unit increasing by? Is there a more efficient wire to use in this instance? If the generator was increased to outputting 128 EU/t, how many EU/t is the storage unit increasing by? In this case, is there a more efficient wire to use?

Sample Problem #2: You have a setup where a generator producing 10 EU/t is 60 blocks away from your storage unit. You want to use 1x insulated copper cables or Ultra-Low Current cables but they cannot deliver the power as you currently have set up. You decide to use exactly one of two intermediate storage units to deliver the power. One unit outputs 30 EU/t, while another outputs 5 EU/t. Which do you choose, where do you place it, and where do you use your 1x insulated copper and Ultra-Low Current cables?


EXTRA INFORMATION!!

If you could manage it, A great idea would be to : Start building some HV-Solar Panels (Forgot the last part)

Make a solar flower out of it, Then make some quantum armor, HV-Cables are needed to transport the HV power from the Panels, Lead them to multiple MFSU's Cause that much power is FAST!

Start charging anything, Have fun!

In IndustrialCraft 2, you'll have power generators and places/things you want to power. Surprise, cables are how we transfer power between machines in IC2!.

Adding to this, I have seen this happen over the past several versions (at least 1.57, but I think earlier). Usually, I have to restart the entire client to get them to fix (exiting to main menu and reloading doesn't work). Breaking and re-placing either the machines or the cables doesn't fix it.

I have also seen this happen with IC2's own cables as well. I don't know that it's necessarily the Mekanism / IC2 cables at issue, because I've got MFSUs directly pointed at my IC2 machines, and when this happens, the machines stop drawing power from the full MFSUs as well. They'll run down their internal buffers, but then they're entirely stop accepting energy. When it happens, it applies to all IC2 machines, not just any one particular one.

(scratch that; doesn't seem to be related) there is an open bug on the IC2 bug tracker that has what I describe with IC2 cables, and it was opened back in February: https://bt.industrial-craft.net/view.php?id=2490

If I come up with any more information, I'll add it, but I think this is an IC2 issue, not a Mekanism issue.

Electrical Engineering 101: Power & Electricity

how to setup power cables for industrial craft

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Credits go to SimpleGuy and jimmy guile, who loves niamh :3

Note that this is still a Work in Progress.

Electricity Transport (IndustrialCraft 2)

I connected everything but my electricity won't flow!

In IndustrialCraft 2, you'll have power generators and places/things you want to power. How that power gets itself from the generation point to where you want to use it is the focus of this Section, and it is probably one of the most important. Unfortunately, there's not a lot of pictures for where we are starting, so be prepared for a long read. So let's get on with it already.

Why is my machine not being powered?

There are a couple of reasons why your machine is not being powered (by electricity). Here are some common reasons.

-If you have a Batbox or a MFE connected to the power source before the actual machine, check to make sure the storage device (MFSU, MFE, Batbox)has its little dot facing the way you want the electricity to flow.

-Make sure the cables are not over 61 blocks, (more info below), or are too far that the power dissipates.

-Make sure the cables are strong enough to hold the electricity. (Try some higher tier cables, they will give better electricity flow)

-If you have a transformer before the machine you want to power make sure that the cables are wired into the correct hole. Most likely, you have a MFE that is powering low voltage things and is blowing them up in your face. When you add a transformer to stop this unpleasant thing from happening, it stops the power altogether. To fix this, make sure that the 3 holed side is facing the medium voltage current and the one holed side is facing the low voltage cable.

-The same is true for a high voltage transformer. Make sure the sides are correctly aligned to the correct cables you want to transform. If you want to convert high voltage to low voltage, (You can also upgrade your machine so you don't have to do this), you must first use the MV then the LV transformers to make sure it works correctly. Double check that everything is aligned correctly. If not, use a wrench to turn it.

These are noobish tips, if you want to dig deeper, keep reading.

Cables

Surprise, cables are how we transfer power between machines in IC2! :) Through a thorough understanding of their use, you should be able to distribute your power in an incredibly efficient manner possible. With your newfound knowledge of the pEU, EU and their "per tick" variants you should be OK. And there are even pictures! Let me be clear and say that when measuring distances, I may say "1 meter" or "1 block" or "1 block length", but all of these are equivalent to the dimension of the side of exactly 1 block in minecraft. So please don't get confused.

First, the most important thing to remember in Minecraft is, that like in the real world, cables are not perfect and not created equally! Different cables will lose energy per packet at different, but set, rates. This 1 EU loss in a distance is known as energy dissipation, and it happens in discrete amounts. That is, if you fall short of the distance that an EU would dissipate, none dissipate! The following picture shows the length of the wire needed to lose at least 1 EU/t within each packet travelling along the wire. Also, notice how cables are able to be insulated, and even doubly insulated. Note that not all wires can be insulated, and not all can be insulated to the same degree. (Note: Like real life, if you try to touch an uninsulated wire you may get shocked... possibly to death)

http://s17.postimage.org/rnone1brz/Wire_Lengths.png

From left to right the cables are: Ultra-Low Current cables, Copper cables, Gold cables, High-Voltage cables, and Glass Fibre cables. From bottom to top the cables are: Uninsulated, 1x Insulated, 2x Insulated, 4x Insulated

As you can clearly see, different wires lose different EU/t per packet at different lengths. Furthermore, each cable is not able to carry equal sized pEU/t within them, although every cable can carry an infinite (theoretically) number of packets per tick. This next image shows the maximum size of packets of EU (pEU) each wire can carry, and each wire is 5 meters tall.

http://s7.postimage.org/uvzp99kor/Wire_Strengths.png

From left to right the cables are: (Same as previous image)..

Ultra-Low Current cables, Copper cables, Gold cables, High-Voltage cables, and Glass Fibre cables.

Colors of Wool:

Red = 1 pEU. Yellow = 10 pEU. Green = 100 pEU.

So, what you should see between these to pictures are the following:

  • Insulation has [i]no effect[/i] on the pEU each the cable can carry, only the amount of energy dissipation over a distance.
  • In general, the lower the pEU capacity of the wire, the longer it is able to be without energy dissipation.

However, these are merely pictures to give you an appreciation for the relative amount each can handle. For exact numbers here is the table for exactly how many lengths of wire it takes to lose 1 EU in each packet, and the maximum pEU capacity of the wire:

Ultra-Low-Current CableCopper CableGold CableHV CableGlass Fibre CableDetector / Splitter Cable
EU/b EU loss EU/b EU loss EU/b EU loss EU/b EU loss EU/b EU loss EU/b EU loss
Uninsulated 0.025 1 EU every 40 blocks 0.3 1 EU every 3.33 blocks 0.5 1 EU every 2 blocks 1.0 1 EU every block 0.025 1 EU every 40 blocks 0.5 1 EU every 2 blocks
Insulated (1") --- 0.2 1 EU every 5 blocks 0.45 1 EU every 2.22 blocks 0.95 1 EU every 1.05 blocks --- ---
Insulated (2") --- --- 0.4 1 EU every 2.5 blocks 0.9 1 EU every 1.11 blocks --- ---
Insulated (3") --- --- --- 0.8 1 EU every 1.25 blocks --- ---

So why is this important? Well, let's suppose you have a 1 EU/t generator and you want to link it to a machine with 61 blocks between. Guess what, no matter what cable you use, the 1 EU/t will dissipate before it reaches your machine! In fact, you could have an infinite number of 1 EU/t generators 61 blocks away from where you want the power to be, and you still won't gain any energy. There would be an infinite number of 1 pEU travelling in whatever wire you chose, and at the 41st block of cable, every packet would have lost 1 EU, becoming 0 EU packets, or effectively disappearing.

Let me illustrate overcoming this problem by supposing you only had one temporary storage machine to use. One way to overcome this dissipation problem is by breaking up the distance by putting it exactly in the middle (creating two lengths of wires, each 30 blocks in length). Thus, if you use Ultra-Low Current cable or Glass Fibre Cable, the packets would be preserved in each 30-block length wire segments, assuming that the storage machine outputs 1 pEU.

The other way to overcome this problem is by brute force. Let's assume for a second that your temporary storage machine only outputs a gigantic 2000 pEU. Let's put it right by the generators, so that there's no EU loss between generators and this storage machine, but the storage machine is still 60 blocks away from your goal. So after your generators feed it 2000 EU, it will spit out one packet of 2000 pEU. Let's say you're using uninsulated High-Voltage Cable, which is the only cable that can handle such huge packets, but loses 1 EU every block. That means, losing 1 EU per block, the packet will arrive at its destination with one 1940 pEU, for a net gain of 1940 EU. So instead of producing 2000 EU and losing it all in 1 pEU, you are producing 2000 EU and delivering a 1940 pEU! So while the higher rates of dissipation for the larger pEU cables may seem discouraging, it may be effective at delivering power great distances.

If you don't feel like losing alot of EU into the cable resistance you can "update" the current with a transformer as seen below.

Cable Splitting

NOTE THAT THIS SECTION IS UNDER REVIEW: LATEST IC2 UPDATES MAY HAD MADE THIS SECTION USELESS/OLD/DEPRICATED

Cable splitting is the fancy term for essentially having a fork in your cables. That is, a cable is a fork if you can point to a spot of cable that has more than two adjacent cables to it:

http://s17.postimage.org/4016clc6n/Fork.png

Anything non-cable such as transformers, machines, or storage units do NOT count as forks.

Although it may seem incredibly useful, it is actually harmful for a few reasons. I have done limited empirical analysis of cable forks, but did not want to try to derive any set of definite equations (as they would more than likely be more complex than useful). Here are the general principles when you want to make a fork:

  • When a fork is made, packet sizes (or pEU) are roughly split by a factor of the fork size and sent down every path. So in the image above, pEU would be split by a factor of two.
  • The number of packets passing through each cable is also roughly split according to wire type. This ratio is dependent on the incoming wire and each of the outgoing wires. The smaller the pEU the wire is able to handle, the more packets that will be sent down it.
  • Forks cause immense overall EU loss through dissipation, depending on the wire used. The best dissipation I found (so far) was only 95% loss of overall pEU size (yes, two 32 pEU can become 1 pEU).
  • The more forks you have, the more your CPU will hate you, as it has to do the above calculations really quickly.

Because of these huge inefficiencies, try to not fork cables when outputting power. Instead, like in the above picture, put an intermediate storage unit, transformer, or other input-output machine where the fork would be. Since it's not a cable there anymore, it's not a fork!

Do not create cable loops. Your computer may hate you to the point of permanently crashing your world due to the number of calculations.

Be careful placing machines next to each other, and pay attention to inputs and outputs. Two machines side by side will try to~ transfer power, so if you then try to connect them with cables you may create a loop!

~Only machines that have outputs will transfer power, such as transformers, generators, storage units, etc. Consumer machines like Macerators, Furnaces, etc. will not transfer power to adjacent machines, as they have no output.

That being said, it is usually OK to have a Batbox output connected via short (10 squares or less) 1x insulated copper wires to various machines you want to use with forks. This is because the machines will draw discrete amounts of EU directly from the storage as needed. The above scenarios encompass cases where arbitrary EU could be sent in any fork.

Yes, there is a difference in qulitay , perhaps. But for short runs (less than 15 feet), that won't show up in the qulitay of the picture. The more expensive cable may have better construction, less likely to break, and could look better. Unless you plan to do a lot of meddling with the cable and its connections, it shouldn't matter.

Transformers

So now that we are experts at EU calculations and cable management, it's time to introduce the big guns. Transformers don't seem that exciting, but they exist to allow you to, say, take Micro Voltages and convert all the way up to Extreme Voltages and back down to Low Voltages at your leisure! Once you are able to do this, you truly are able to power anything since you can manage dissipation well, and provide power at the correct packet size.

First, let me introduce some common terminologies for IC2 packet sizes (or "Voltages") and the cables that can be used with them:

Note that from now on, I will distinguish whether a transformer has been powered by redstone or not by using these acronyms to save my fingers some trouble:

  • "NR-transformer" to distinguish a non-redstone powered transformer.
  • "RS-transformer" to emphasize a redstone powered transformer.

Now if you have ever placed a transformer, you have probably noticed that one side has three dots, and the other five sides have one. This is because what wires you run to which sides matter! No matter which transformer you use, the pattern is always the same: the more dots a side has, the higher pEU it handles. That is, if you want to transform between two packet sizes, always assume the bigger packet comes through the side with three dots, regardless whether you're transforming up or down. Note that when you first place a transformer, the side with 3 dots will be facing you by default. Using a wrench on a 1-dotted side will move the 3 dots to that side, and using the wrench on the 3-dotted side will remove the transformer.

Here is an image of an example setup:

http://s14.postimage.org/5y5l994gh/Transformers.png

What the hell? I ran my generator twice and I got more energy out the second time!


If you understand the setup above and how it works, then you're good to go. If not, and are still puzzled as to why more energy was gained than put in the generator, then understand that when redstoned, transformers have a tiny amount of storage capacity for EU! In order to transform up, it has to save enough EU from smaller packets to generate and send out a bigger packet. So when a piece of coal was first put in the generator, only 2,048 EU made it to the batbox at the bottom. The other 1,952 EU is "stuck" in the transformers since it isn't enough to fire a 2,048 "Extreme Voltage" pEU. Then, when a second coal is placed, it looks like you got 4,096 EU out of a 4,000 EU item, when really the EU from the coal used some of the the stored EU to fire two 2048 pEU from the HV RS-transformer. The lesson here is to be careful with transforming to high pEU size when your overall EU production is low.

So if you aren't convinced of how awesome transformers are then keep reading!

A simple and intleleignt point, well made. Thanks!

Current Control

Why not use the fact that transformers allow current to flow one way to create a remote storage that can be tapped into at any time?

Imagine the problem: You want to deliver power to a location from remote storage, but you also want to store energy there without putting generators all the way out there. That is, you want to be able to generate power in your house, store it in a huge array of EU storage devices elsewhere that isn't your house, but deliver power back to your house. If you run cables all the way out there and back, imagine all the EU dissipation!

Instead, you can use a combination of transformers and the "cable-splitting with Transformers" concept to control flow using redstone. The following two images should nicely convey what I mean. Note I used Eloraam's awesome RedPower 2 mod for Redstone Wiring (which can go up to 255 blocks without losing signal) and for small edging to separate the adjacent wires.

http://s18.postimage.org/l084lm1fd/Transport_Storage.png

When the lever is in one state, you can power your batteries remotely...

http://s17.postimage.org/59ebjvkbz/Transport_Usage.png

...but flick the lever, and you can use the batteries at home!

Power Storage (IndustrialCraft 2)

Section to be continued...

Sample Problem Solutions

The EU

SP #1: The first case would indeed blow up the storage unit. The storage unit can only accept 32 pEU. The Generator outputs 64 pEU. However, in the second case the two generators, in one tick, each produce 32 pEU for a total of 64 EU. The storage unit accepts 32 pEU, so it would store 64 EU/t.

SP #2: a) 128 EU

b) 128 EU

c) 32 EU

d) No answer is possible.

e) 8 pEU

f) 256 pEU

g) 4 packets

h) No answer is possible.

i) No answer is possible.

Cables

SP #1: The storage unit is receiving 0 EU/t from your generator, using the following logic:

Look up loss rate of 2x insulated gold cable: 1 EU loss per 2.5 blocks.

[Total # of EU loss] / [Total # blocks traveled] = [Loss Rate of Cable] [size=8pt][i](Now we plug in values)[/i][/size]

[Total # of EU loss] / [80 Blocks] = [1 EU / 2.5 Blocks]

Total # of EU loss = 32 EU

Production Rate - Dissipation Loss = Total EU Gain per tick 32 EU - 32 EU = Total EU Gain per tick 0 EU = Total EU Gain per tick

Thus, it'd be more efficient to use 1x insulated copper cable, as the above equations would instead yield a total EU gain of 16 EU/t. If the generator instead outputs 128 EU/t, the total gain in the storage unit would be 96 EU/t. Only Glass Fibre would be more efficient, but none is available. Thus, 2x insulated gold cable is the most efficient in this instance.

SP #2: Optimally, we will want to start using copper cables from the generator, since Ultra-Low-Current cables cannot handle 10 EU/t packets. A storage unit could be placed right next to the generator to accept power immediately with no EU loss, but then 59 blocks of distance would remain. If four 1x insulated copper cables are used before using a storage unit, then only 55 blocks would remain and no EU loss would occur. So this configuration is optimal.

The remaining 55 blocks need to be analyzed. Either two 5 pEU can be emitted and Ultra-Low-Current cable can be used, or one 30 pEU can be emitted and copper cables be used. EU dissipation occurs only once for the Ultra-Low-Current cable, since it happens over 40 blocks. However, it happens across two 5 pEU, so two EU is lost. This means for every 10 EU/t produced, 8 EU/t reaches the storage unit. If 1x copper wire were used instead with 30 pEU, loss occurs eleven times for 11 EU dissipation. So for every 30 EU/t produced, 19 EU/t reaches the storage unit. Using percentages, the Ultra-Low-Current cable keeps 80% of the EU produced intact, while only 63.3% of the EU produced is intact when using 1x insulated copper cable.

Thus, four 1x insulated copper wires would be used to go from the generator to the 5 pEU intermediate storage device, and then 55 Ultra-Low-Current cables would be used for a maximum efficiency of 80%.

Recipes, Information & "What can I make!?"

In this section you'll find how to build pretty much everything that somehow touches an Energy Unit. You'll see the item name, a list of all the basic resources you need to craft one, pictures that show step-by-step how to craft one from scratch, and then a thorough description and EU knowledge about the machine. Note that when it comes to ingots, I will list the amount of dust you need (assuming you macerate ores), the amount of ore you need (assuming you don't macerate ores), and the amount of ingots you need (assuming you just keep everything as ingots). These are all equivalent, you do not need to have all 3. Also realize that refined iron and steel are equivalent.

Cables

Ultra-Low-Current Cable

Maximum Packet Size: 5 pEU

EU Dissipation: 1 EU per packet every 40 blocks

This cable is uninsulated and cannot be painted. Since it is in fact uninsulated, it is capable of shock. Field trials with over 150 Solar Panels and a batbox could not produce enough current to shock a creature.

Uninsulated Copper Cable

1x Insulated Copper Cable

Uninsulated Gold Cable

1x Insulated Gold Cable

2x Insulated Gold Cable

Uninsulated High-Voltage Cable

1x Insulated High-Voltage Cable

2x Insulated High-Voltage Cable

4x Insulated High-Voltage Cable

Glass Fibre Cable

EU Storage Devices

MFSU (Ten million EU Outputs 512)

MFE (Six hundred thousand Outputs 128)

Batbox (Fourty thousand Outputs 32 Machine Current)

EU Generators

Windmills

Solar panels

Solar Arrays

Nuclear Reactors

TBC...

EU-Using Machines

Generator

Extractor

Compressor

Induction furnace

MFSU

Macerator


Wires:5x copper cable / 3x glass fiber cable / 1x gold cable

WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: Tekkit - How To Make And Use All Cables (Basics)

This mod idea is based on PowerCrystals "Power Converters" Mod. sag mills or arc furnaces and then you need that one industrial craft machine to craft your jetpack. energy to another type - just connect a cable or any machine to the producer and you are good to go. . Can you provide a screenshot of your setup ?.

Cable (IndustrialCraft 2)

The BatBox is the most basic of several energy storage devices in Industrial Craft. It is able to store up to 40,000 EU and can accept currents of up to 32 EU/t (Otherwise it will explode) from any of its 5 input faces (but no more than 32 EU/t in total;

if one face is accepting 32 EU/t, other input faces cannot take any power). It can also emit a current of 32 EU/t from its output face. They are useful for initial energy storage, and later on, backup power for a few machines.

Like all storage units its output face is marked by a special texture, a small orange dot, which usually faces the player when the block is placed. The direction of the output face can be changed by right-clicking with a Wrench onto any of the input faces of the block; normally, this will point the output face towards the player, but holding Shift while clicking will point the output face in the opposite direction. Be aware that right-clicking the BatBox while pointing at its output face will dismantle it, while right-clicking anywhere else will change the side of the output.

Applying a Redstone signal to the BatBox will make it stop emitting power from the output face if the redstone behaviour option is set to do not output energy.

The BatBox can charge most energy storage devices. It is also very useful to implement BatBoxes to store power from Generators and also as a method of extending the reach of your Cables. A typical starter setup of Industrial devices involves a natural generator (such as a Windmill or Solar Panel) feeding into a BatBox with a row of Copper Cable along the front of the BatBox which feeds into any side of your Macerator, Electric Furnace, etc (in essence, a T-shaped network). Note that the BatBox resets the cable length energy loss calculations, so they work well to extend your power network; using up to four insulated copper cable segements from the Generator to the BatBox and up to four segments away from your BatBox to all your devices without losing any energy. Likewise, they can very easily be daisy chained to extend your storage capabilities.


When a Batbox is right clicked with an Energy Sensor Kit, it will give you an Energy Sensor Location Card, which can be used in the Industrial Information Panel to get constant info about that specific Batbox.

The BatBox is a Tier 1 energy storage device. Simpler to craft, but otherwise inferior to the MFE Unit (Tier 2) and the MFS Unit (Tier 3).

And also, BatBoxes are sometimes confused as the RedPower Battery Box, causing some trouble to players.

Effective EMC (counting the sticky resin's EMC value for rubber's EMC value): 3895

Note: that the MFE unit, EU-storage-wise, is worth 15 batboxes, but has an Effective EMC Value of only 39,168 (EMC cost of 15 Batboxes: 58,425) making it far more EMC and space effective than the Batbox.  

Recipe

Usage

Electric Jetpack

BatBox Cart

Video Tutorial

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how to setup power cables for industrial craft

This mod idea is based on PowerCrystals "Power Converters" Mod. sag mills or arc furnaces and then you need that one industrial craft machine to craft your jetpack. energy to another type - just connect a cable or any machine to the producer and you are good to go. . Can you provide a screenshot of your setup ?.

how to setup power cables for industrial craft
Written by Gojind
1 Comment
  • Faenos

    FaenosAugust 19, 2019 3:26 PM

    You are absolutely right. In it something is also idea excellent, I support.

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