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Stardew valley how to craft more things

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Stardew valley how to craft more things
June 17, 2019 Entertainment and Movies 4 comments

There's so much to do in Stardew Valley. When you first land on your farm it'll be an overgrown mess, but in no time you'll be planting crops, catching fish, fighting monsters in the mines, hunting for lost treasures, and getting a taste of just how deep this game goes. You can grow grapes to make wine, tap trees for maple syrup, raise cows and then make cheese from the milk. It can be a tad bit overwhelming, which is why our Stardew Valley guide is full of tips to help get you running.

Here's what you should know before starting Stardew Valley, including what to do your first year and how to prioritize your spending.

Once you've got a good farming foundation, check out our list of the best Stardew Valley mods and our tips for Stardew Valley multiplayer.  

Choose your farm type wisely

In the 1.1 update, Stardew Valley had several new farm maps added. You can still choose the original, wide open field map from the game’s launch, but the others add support for those who may prefer fishing or fighting over farming. If you’ll be playing for the first time, the standard farm is a good, balanced option to help you figure out what pastimes are your favorite route through the game.

The riverland farm, as you might expect, is largely water. This cuts back on the farmable land but lets you catch all the river and lake fish that you otherwise would have to walk to town to lure in. Don’t forget the crab pots, either!

The forest farm provides foraging opportunities and respawning stumps for collecting hardwood. The hilltop farm adds a mining area, which is more convenient than going to the quarry. The wilderness farm spawns monsters at night, providing access to loot in your backyard, instead of trekking to the mines.

Activate "Always Show Tool Hit Location" immediately

I really like Stardew Valley, but the controls were incredibly confusing for me at first. It felt like I wasn't always watering/chopping/hoeing the square I was aiming at, and I couldn't figure out why. Then I discovered the "Always Show Tool Hit Location" option in the settings menu, which shows a red outline around the tile you are targeting, and immediately understood what was happening. If your mouse is pointed at one of the eight squares adjacent to your character, that's where you'll hit. But if it's farther away in any direction, you'll hit the square directly in front of the direction your character is facing.

It doesn't behave as you'd expect if you are used to playing twin-stick shooters or Terraria, which follows your mouse more accurately. Initially I assumed that if my mouse was in the top-left corner of the screen, I would be aiming at the top-left block adjacent to my character. Activating "Always Show Tool Hit Location" was pretty much the only way I could tell where I was going wrong, and it goes a long way in teaching you how to more accurately control your farmer.

You probably won't need the feature once you get comfortable with the controls, but it's vital at the game's start. And who knows, maybe developer ConcernedApe will change it to be on by default, the same way he did with auto run.

Watch TV every morning

It's easy to pass right by your TV in the mornings, but it's worth clicking through the various channels each time you wake up, especially since the game pauses while you read. The Weather Forecast is straightforward, telling you what you can expect for the next day. While it's not immediately useful information, it can potentially change what you might want to do that day if you know it will be raining the next.

The Fortune Teller is another one that can seem unimportant, but can genuinely shape what you plan for the day is. How "lucky" the Fortune Teller says your day will be directly influences certain RNG events within the game. Two important ones for that are item quality and ore in the mines. Picking crops or doing similar activities on lucky days increases the likelihood of those items being higher quality, thus selling for more.

And finally the irregular shows, Queen of Sauce and Livin' Off The Land, can be incredibly important. Queen of Sauce will teach you a new cooking recipe once a week, which becomes more relevant once you have a kitchen to cook in. On the other hand, Livin' Off The Land has immediately relevant information, telling you things you would otherwise only be able to learn from the game's official wiki page—like which fish are only available to catch during a season and the location and time of day then can be found.

Look out for worms

If you’ve got keen eyes, you may have already noticed the occasional wiggling lines sticking out of the dirt—and if you haven’t seen them yet then make sure to keep your eyes peeled, because these worms aren’t just decoration. If you hit them with your hoe, you’ll dig up an item. This is the only way to find the lost books from the library, which can fill you in with hints and secrets when read. Apart from books, you can dig up artifacts for the museum and occasionally (if you’re unlucky) plain ol’ mud.

Don’t be surprised if you don’t see them as often or abundantly as in the picture above—in fact, that screenshot is definitely the exception rather than the rule. But be on the lookout for movement among the dirt and you’ll start seeing worms more often than you would have guessed. They seem to be more common when it’s raining and potentially on lucky days, so make sure to follow the tip above and always watch TV in the morning!

This tip didn’t make it into the first version of this list, but was hotly suggested in the comments below. Thanks everyone!

Go to bed

Let's just say I learned this the hard way so you don't have to. Staying up past 1 AM isn't much of a problem as long as you don't run entirely out of energy, but you will wake up with slightly less energy the next day. But once the clock strikes 2 AM, your Cinderella dress fades away as you hit the dirt and pass out on the ground, which is a whole lot worse than just going to sleep tired.

You'll have less energy the next day and be charged for a percentage of your total gold for the expense of whoever dragged you home that night. Additionally, and I may be crazy and wrong about this as I couldn't find anyone else who mentioned it, but I'm pretty sure I once lost a whole day after passing out in the woods. Either way, it's not worth the risk. It's good to push your usable hours to the max, but make sure you can still get home in time for a real bed each night.

Fix the bridge to the tide pools early

From the very start of the game, there's a broken plank across the river on the right side of the beach that requires 300 wood to fix. Now, 300 wood is a whole lot, especially early in the game when it may take you a full day or two of chopping trees to get that amount, but it's definitely worth it in the long run. Repairing the bridge gives you access to the tide pools, a small extension to the beach area without much to do. What it does have, however, is Sea Urchins and Coral lying on the ground.

Sea Urchins and Coral, along with a few other things that occasionally show up, can be foraged from this area practically daily and sell for a surprising amount—which can make for an extremely helpful boost of gold in the early game. You make money slowly for your first few seasons, and the tide pools area offers a reliable (and, once opened, free) source of income. You won't miss the wood next season, and you will be thankful for the extra cash.

Build a silo before cutting your grass

Your farm is in a pretty sorry state at the start of the game, but resist the urge to immediately clear out the entire thing—at least hold off cutting the grass. When you chop down grass with the Scythe, it automatically collects as Hay, which is useful should you plan on raising any animals. The thing is, you only get Hay if you have a Silo in which to collect that straw. 

A Silo is pretty easy to build. The nominal cost of 100g, 100 stone, 10 clay, and five copper bars isn't too difficult to come by, even in the early game. Build one before cutting all that grass and you should be plenty stocked for the coming winter.

Bring food into the mines

Food is easy to underestimate when you first start Stardew Valley, primarily because you don’t have a kitchen and raw food just isn’t that impressive. But the ability to regenerate energy and health can be vital, especially when you’re trying to get the most out of each trip into the mines. Some of the community bundles can let you jump ahead a bit by giving you small quantities of high-end foods like chocolate cake, but even just crafting a handful of field snacks (unlocked from getting level one in foraging) can make the difference between passing out breaking rocks and making it to the next elevator.

Crab pots are totally worth it

The crab pot is an item where you place it into a body of water (most profitably, the ocean), equip it with bait, and the next day you can return to collect your cretaceous catch. They definitely aren’t an early-game item as you have to have level three fishing to craft or buy them, and they are either take three iron bars to craft or 1,500 gold to buy. Definitely not cheap, but they have the potential for a massive return on your investment. They never break or run out, and as long as you keep them baited (which isn’t difficult if you are getting lots of bug meat from the mines) crab pots represent a nearly daily source of endless income.

What’s more, simply using a crab pot will let you complete the crab pot bundle in the community center, which (slight spoilers) will earn you three more crab pots. It’s definitely slow-goings at first, but if you aren’t a fan of fishing you can speed the process up by taking the Trapper profession at fishing level five, which changes the recipe of a crab pot from 40 wood and three iron bars, to 25 wood and two copper bars—a significantly lower cost to pay. Basically, crab pots start out looking expensive and slow, but if properly maintained are essentially an infinite source of free money. Nice, right?

Upgrade your watering can strategically

It’s a natural impulse to want to upgrade your tools as soon as you can, and the watering can should be high on the list of which to upgrade first. You’ll quickly realize that the more your farm grows, the more time and energy you are spending on simply watering every morning—and sprinklers are slow to get. Upgrading your watering can will save you precious energy, as it allows you to hold down the left mouse button and water multiple squares at once.

However, like all tools, upgrading it takes two days, meaning you’ll have one full day without the ability to water your plants. Luckily the sky can do that for you. Watch the weather report everyday (do you believe that watching TV is important yet?) and wait until the forecast for the next day is rain. Then you can water your plants in the morning, give your watering can to Clint to be upgraded, let the rain water your crops the next day, and finally pick up your watering can at 9am the day after. This way your crops won’t miss a single watering.

 Build the greenhouse before your first winter

It can be easy to let the first spring pass you by without digging into the Community Center upgrades. If so, you could miss out on getting the greenhouse during your first year. While there are other activities during the winter, like digging up worms to find a concerning number of missing library books or delving deep into the mines, having the greenhouse available keeps the gold flowing during an otherwise fruitless season. 

For the necessary pantry bundles, you will need one of several crops from each season along with five gold star rated crops in each season. Don’t let spring and summer turn into autumn without staying on track and stocking up on fertilizer to improve crop quality. You’ll also need some animal and artisan products, so keep an eye on upgrading your coop or barn as needed.  

As an additional tip, make sure to invest in seeds like blueberries, cranberries, and tomatoes that all bear fruit continuously without being replanted. Paired with several sprinklers, you can go explore the mines every day of the winter without wasting your energy watering and planting crops.

Don't forget birthdays!

Talking to villagers at least once a day will slowly increase their friendship with you, as will giving gifts they like. The fastest way to their hearts, literally, is by giving a gift on their birthday. Make sure to check the calendar hanging outside Pierre’s store (or buy your own) so you don’t miss one. As of the 1.1 update, all NPCs now appreciate the quality of gifts you give them, so long as it’s something they "like" or "love." Each quality level adds a multiplier to the friendship points you receive, along with the 8x bonus you already get for it being a birthday gift. It’s not just the thought that counts, so make sure to give Gold and Iridium star items as presents if you can!

Feel the need for speed

Later in the game, you’ll have amassed an exhaustive list of chores each day. Even if you’ve automated your farm with sprinklers, you may find yourself heading to the desert mines, passing out gifts to villagers, or any other number of other tasks. There are several ways to get around the valley faster that you’ll want to unlock so you don’t waste the day just walking around. 

The mine cart system which is initially busted can be repaired by completing the boiler room bundles with loot and ores from the mines. It will take you instantly to several key locations around town. A horse is also faster than hoofing it yourself, though getting the 100 hardwood needed for a stable can take some time for anyone not living on the forest farm map. As a final pick-me-up, coffee increases your speed for about a minute and a half, including your horse’s speed. You can buy coffee for 300g at the Saloon, but growing it yourself is the better option. You can find coffee beans as a random selection at the traveling cart. Turn the beans into a cup o’ joe by putting them in a keg and then sell whatever you don’t drink for profit.

Some images via the Stardew Valley wiki.

Living off the land ain’t easy. There’s a lot about Stardew Valley that the game doesn’t really explain, which makes jumping in a bit daunting.

Heck, after playing dozens of hours myself, I still feel like I’m finding out new things about how the game works every day. So, I thought it might be useful to share some of the things I’ve learned along the way.

[This post originally appeared on March 4th, 2016, however, we’ve heavily updated it with a ton of new tips.]

[We’ve updated this post again with tips for playing on the Nintendo Switch]

The Switch Controls Are Great, But Some Aren’t Explained

There are a couple little things for the Switch controls that you won’t figure out until after trying every button. Pressing Y to take one item from a stack is one of them. You can also press X to exit out of letters and quests. While you can cycle through menus and your tools using the triggers, the shoulder buttons allow you to shift through the rows of your inventory. If you need to use the cursor, you can trigger it with the right analog stick.

Play With The Sound On

You might not want to bother anyone on the train if you’re taking your console with you, but a lot of things in Stardew Valley require sound cues. Fishing is especially hard if you’re playing on mute in handheld mode. While your lure will shake and a small exclamation point will appear above your character’s head when you get a bite, it’s not nearly as attention-grabbing without the klaxon sound effect. When the JoyCon are detached this isn’t as big of a deal because they vibrate, but in handheld mode, they do not. Don’t forget your headphones.

Watch Your Energy Levels

When you first arrive at Stardew Valley, what you can do is pretty limited. Make sure you’re keeping an eye on your energy bar so that you never overexert yourself. You’ll wake up with less energy the next day if you do, which will make things even worse!

If You’re Not Using Tools, Unequip Them

Any time you accidentally use a tool, you use up energy. I make this mistake often while trying to talk to villagers, so it’s worth getting in the habit of unequipping tools. Alternatively, you can have a weapon as your active item, because swinging those doesn’t use up energy.

Turn On Tool Hit Location

This option will let you see exactly where a tool will land when you use it, which is also useful for not wasting needless energy while accidentally missing your target.

Be Mindful of Your Time

Time passes pretty quickly in Stardew Valley. Going from one end of the map to the other can sometimes take hours, and that’s time you don’t want to waste. Stores are only open during certain timeframes, after all.

Before you start a new day, hash out a general idea of what you want to accomplish before you go out there. It’s good to stick to a couple of activities at most, especially since part of your day will always involve tending to your crops and livestock.

If you’re the meticulous type, you can even use this online planner to etch out exactly how you’ll use your plot of land without having to spend any in-game time scouting.

This might seem like overkill at first, but when you unlock all the different areas and activities in Stardew Valley, you won’t have enough hours in the day.

If You’re Not Doing Anything, Pause

Unless you want time to pass, make use of your ESC key to pause the game. Talking to people, or looking at menus (like for a chest, or when purchasing items) also pauses the game, so don’t worry about taking too long there. Either way, pausing is useful because you don’t want to waste too much in-game time deciding if you want to plant a pumpkin or an eggplant.

Don’t Stay Up Past Midnight

When the clock hits 2am, your character will pass out, no matter what they’re doing. The doctor will always find you and bring you home, but he’ll charge you—and the next day, you might not have as much energy. Do not let this happen to you! Once it gets late, stop whatever you’re doing and start heading back home.

Late night mindfulness is especially important when you’re in the mines, as walking back home can take over an hour. I stop spelunking around 11:30PM, and even then, that’s cutting it close.

Forage The Land

Your farm is rich with resources, so make use of them! Chop down trees, mine stones: whatever you need, take it. Just don’t get carried away by using too much energy doing it.

Build Chests

You can only carry so many things at a time. Once you’ve stockpiled a bit of wood, go into your crafting menu. For 50 wood, you can build a chest (and a bunch of other things too—get acquainted with this menu!)

Use chests to organize everything you pick up in Stardew Valley. I find it’s useful to have a chest inside my house, one next to my crops, one next to my barn, and one next to the mines. My house chest has things I don’t use very often but want to keep around. My crop one has farming tools. My barn one has livestock-related items. And my mine chest has weapons and monster loot.

A different system might work better for you, the point is to store items where you actually use them—which can cut down time you’re walking to and from different areas, as well as reduce the number of times you become over-encumbered.

Get 300 Wood To Unlock A New Area

Wanna make a lot of money quick early in your game? Head down to the beach area and make a right. You should find a broken bridge. You can fix it for 300 wood. Over on the other side, you can find a variety of items, like shells and coral, which you can sell to the fisherman down south for a good sum. These items replenish every couple of days, so it’s worth taking a look if you’re in the area. (I find it’s not worth going down there unless I’m already turning in fish.)

Upgrade Your Backpack

Right next to Pierre’s cash register, you should spot a backpack. You can buy it! It costs $2k, and it’s worth it.

Don’t Throw Anything Away

Unless it’s literal trash, everything you pick up in Stardew Valley has a use, be it crafting, or gift fodder. Heck, even junk can be turned into something useful if you build a recycling machine. Instead of trashing items, you’re better off stockpiling EVERYTHING in organized chests. You never know when you might need it.

My rule of thumb is: sell anything with a star on it, and keep one of everything, just in case. Keeping one of everything is an easy way to fulfill NPC quests.

Season specific bonuses: In Fall, there’s an event where you need to display your best items. You’ll get graded well for nicer things, so keeping around some gold-star produce and rare items for this event is recommended during the fall.

Also, keep at least some hops for the winter time—by then, you’ll know how to brew. The most valuable thing to brew is wheat, so make sure to grow some during the summer.

Use Fertilizer

While you can plant whatever you’d like right away, you won’t get very good crops out of it. After you’ve foraged a little, you should have a stockpile of sap lying around. Go into your crafting menu and make fertilizer. It’s 2 sap per box, and each box covers a square of land. Each and every single thing you plant should be fertilized first, and then watered daily. Your prize will be better quality crops, which you can sell for a bigger profit.

You also have the option of using Retaining Soil Fertilizer, which might keep your plants watered overnight. I don’t think it’s worth it. Speed-Gro Fertlizer makes your crops grow faster by 10%, but unless the season is about to change, that’s not really worth it, either. Have patience!

Grow The Best Crop

All seeds are not made equal; some are worth more than others. Here’s a spreadsheet that breaks exactly what each crop will net you at Pierre’s, but if you want a quick breakdown of the most profitable seeds, look below:

Fall: Cranberries, Eggplants, Pumpkins.

Spring: Cauliflower, Kale, Potatoes.

Summer: Blueberries, Melon, Red Cabbage.

In short, berries OP.

Plant Things In A 3X3 Grid

Oh, I’m not going to spoil why. Just do it!

Plant Flowers Next To Honey

It’ll make your honey worth more.

Make Artisan Products

Fancy items are worth more than raw materials. If you can make eggs, build a mayonnaise machine. If you have a cow and can produce cheese, make a cheese press. And you should definitely make a preserves jar as soon as you can; you can dump whatever you’d like in there to make either jam or pickles. Finally, yes, you do want that bee house...just note that you won’t get any honey during the winter.

Sell Your Produce

Crops will be your main source of income. At the start, it may be tempting to eat your items for more energy, but don’t do it. Buying upgrades will be worth more to you and will save you more time in the long run.

Buy In Bulk

Shift click on items at shops to buy 5 items at a time.

Watch TV

Your house comes packed with a television, and you should watch it every day. Weather reports for the next day are useful for obvious reasons, and sometimes you’ll also come across unique programming, like cooking shows, which can teach you new things.

Check The Notice Board

There are two primary ways of getting quests in Stardew Valley: letters and the notice board. Sometimes, you’ll get mail from residents asking for specific items. Or, if you right click on the board on Pierre’s shop, you can take on quests there. Some quests might be lucrative, others not. Don’t feel like you HAVE to do a quest just because you took it, because there are always others around the corner. Quests are mainly meant to prompt you into trying new things, which means they won’t always reasonable or do-able. They are a good way of becoming friendlier with the residents of Stardew Valley, however.

Secondly, the notice board also has a calendar on it. Check it out so you know when events are coming up, or when someone is about to have a birthday. Make sure to give people gifts on their birthdays! The calendar is also good for knowing when the season will end. Every crop will die when a season ends, so make sure you’re not planting anything that will take too long to grow near the end of a season.

Mind The Rain

Rainy days are special. You won’t have to spend time watering plants on rainy days. But, more importantly, you’ll A) get rarer fish on that day B) get rarer items in the mines. Make use of rainy days!

Make Friends

Image Credit: Bacchus

Don’t get swept up farming and exploring, because Stardew Valley is more than that. It’s also a game about people. Everyone has a unique story that’s worth hearing. If nothing else, you really don’t want to be the loser at the event that nobody wants to dance with.

Talk to people every day. Get to know their routines, their likes and dislikes. Give them gifts (the official Stardew Valley Wiki is a quick way of finding out what people prefer.) Eventually, when you get to know someone well enough, they’ll start giving you unique dialogue options, as well as special events. Being friendly with people is also the only way you can visit someone’s room, too, and that’s a nice way of learning more about who they actually are.

Romance Cuties

You can romance up to 10 characters in Stardew Valley, regardless of your gender. Your options include:

Image Credit: Stardew Valley Wiki

If you want to romance somebody, you need to talk to them and get to know them better. Give them gifts (you can give someone up to two gifts per week). Do quests for them. When you get to eight hearts, you can get serious with somebody by giving them a bouquet, which you can buy at Pierre’s. Finally, if you want to lock it down completely and marry someone, you’ll need a Mermaid Pendant. Per the Stardew Valley Wiki:

The Mermaid’s Pendant (5000g) can only be acquired by the Old Mariner on the beach after you’ve repaired the bridge (300 wood), upgraded your house at least once, and only on stormy days. You cannot obtain the pendant in the Winter since it does not rain. The wedding will take place 3 days after you propose and be handled by the person you are marrying. After the Marriage Ceremony is complete, your new partner will move into your farm.

Note that if you marry anybody, they can get jealous of you for giving items to other villagers, so be careful.

You can check your standing with NPCs, including how many gifts you’ve given someone, by pausing and going into the heart menu:

Befriend The Wizard

Becoming pals with the wizard is useful: after a few hearts, he’ll let you enter a special room where you can change your character’s appearance for $500. I found it easiest to give the Wizard my extra void essences, which you can pick up pretty much anywhere within the mines.

Explore The Mines

Despite all the comparisons to Harvest Moon, around half of Stardew Valley is actually combat related. Every once in a while, it’s worth trying to go deeper into the mines to see what you’ll find. Any monster loot you pick up can be sold at the Adventurer’s Guild next door, and every ten floors you’ll get a special item. Every five floors, there’s an elevator, so making progress is easy. Just be careful in there. If you lose all your health, you’ll faint and awaken on the ground floor...with some items and money missing. The game will also reset some of your progress in the mines after fainting, so it’s bad news!

Also, it’s possible to fish inside the mines, too. If you find a body of water, cast your line, see what bites. The mines have special fish you can’t find anywhere else.

FYI, the mines should unlock a week into spring. If you’re having trouble locating it, go a little northeast of the carpenter’s shop. It should be to the right of Linus’ tent.

Finally, the fastest route to the mines is the road above your ranch, NOT through the town.

Stardew Valley is a farming simulation role-playing video game developed by Eric The player can also engage in fishing, cooking, and crafting, and also explore they will lose most of their energy and a random amount of money and items.

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Stranded Sails aims to be one of the most charming and relaxing games of the year, with an infectious mix of crafting, combat, and farming simulation elements. The survival genre is certainly having a moment right now, with games like Minecraft and Boundless paving the way for more high concept titles like Ark: Survival Evolved and Conan Exiles. Stranded Sails, the new project from Lemonbomb Entertainment, combines these intense mechanics with the more laid back approach seen in classic adventures like Harvest Moon and Stardew Valley.

Developer Lemonbomb Entertainment cut their teeth with the low key multiplayer battler, Nova Nukers, and now they're back with a more ambitious adventure that combines survival gameplay with the more relaxing world of farming simulators. Armed with a colorful art style and a suite of survival mechanics, Stranded Sails looks to combine the sensibilities of all the aforementioned games to create a unique experience that appeals to hardcore crafting connoisseurs and casual players alike. One could even think of it as akin to something like Don't Starve, but minus the roguelike elements and with the claustrophobic pressure dialed down to a much more manageable level.

Continue scrolling to keep readingClick the button below to start this article in quick view.

Related: Screen Rant's The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening Review

At a press event held by publisher Merge Games in New York City, Screen Rant sat down with Lemonbomb co-founder and Creative Director Roman Matuszczak to play a hands-on demo of Stranded Sails, and we came away impressed with the game's inviting style and surprisingly deep mechanics. In Stranded Sails, players take on the role of the captain's son or daughter; after wrecking on a deserted island, the captain is injured and it's up to the young upstart to keep their crew alive while discovering the secrets of the cursed islands. There's plenty to discover and explore in the islands, and players will have plenty of opportunities to survive and thrive in Stranded Sails, a uniquely relaxing take on the survival genre.

Our half-hour play session with Stranded Sails showed off how the game strives to cover all the bases of the survival genre, from crafting and cooking to exploring and even fighting off scary enemies. Our adventures in the cursed isles can be seen in its entirety in the exclusive gameplay footage embedded above. The menu system is simple and intuitive, and keeping with the game's core spirit of providing depth without sacrificing accessibility. Likewise, the combat is punchy and exciting, relying on a single attack button and real-time positioning, not unlike the classic top-down Legend of Zelda games. Dodging attacks and countering with a flurry of swings is simple, but responsive and effective. It's easy to learn, but still provides a decent challenge, as can be seen in the gameplay video.

Combat is given an extra layer of depth with the stamina system. Pretty much every action costs stamina, from running and climbing to every swing of the sword. The best way to recover stamina is to eat food, which connects to Stranded Sails' cooking and farming mechanics. Many of the crew set up a small settlement on the island, resulting in a central location for players to craft items, farm crops, cook food, and otherwise prepare for excursions to the more uncharted parts of the island. Farming produces food which can be combined to create powerful dishes that replenish more stamina. It's a simple loop, but if Breath of the Wild taught us anything, it's that cooking in video games is surprisingly fun, especially when it feeds into the core adventure gameplay mechanics.

Players can also fish for food, in an entertaining fishing minigame. Relying on a rhythm-based series of timed button presses, fishing is a bit more involved, without being overly complex to the point of distraction. From crafting to fishing, farming to cooking, every mechanic is tied to an NPC, adding precious context to the adventure, and making the player feel more like they're responsible for a community, not just powering themselves up in a self-motivated power fantasy. It all builds up to make Stranded Sails a cozy and warm experience, rather than merely a series of bars to be filled as the game progresses. The visuals add to this charm, with a minimalist style evocative of 1990s 3D graphics, but without any of the technical limitations that held back the PlayStation/Sega Saturn era.

In addition to fighting and cooking, exploration plays a large role in Stranded Sails. In real life, the prospect of being trapped on a deserted island is intimidating and scary, but it's also a harbinger of grand adventure, and Stranded Sails looks to tap into that wide-eyed optimism with secrets abound and side paths aplenty to uncover and explore. The camera is fixed to an isometric perspective, which keeps the open nature of the island from getting too intimidating, and many paths are blocked off by impassable boundaries that can only be bypassed through crafting, like building a bridge to pass a massive gap. The linear storyline takes players to much of the island, but we were told there are plenty of locations that will only reveal themselves to the boldest of explorers.

Unlike many survival games these days, Stranded Sails is designed with a linear storyline in mind, which Matuszczak assures us will last players around 15-20 hours. Despite the plethora of systemic opportunities inherent in a survival game like this, some players just can't get into a game that doesn't have the context of a proper storyline, and Stranded Sails aims to keep players around for at least the duration of the story, completing quests and building up their shipwrecked community. Some players may not be interested in pursuing the post-game adventures offered by most games of this genre, but the main story should still be enough to satisfy those players. With a little luck, Lemonbomb plans to get players engaged with an entertaining and momentum-driven story, and then keep them hooked with the prospect of building up their base, growing their farm, and crafting more and more items.

Players will have the chance to explore the cursed islands for themselves when Stranded Sails launches later this fall for PC, Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and Nintendo Switch.

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Once you've stockpiled a bit of wood, go into your crafting menu. For 50 wood, you can build a chest (and a bunch of other things too—get.

How to make money quick in Stardew Valley and other useful Year One tips

Artisan Goods

How to Craft All Items in Stardew Valley

Mayonnaise Machine – Turns eggs into mayonnaise.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 2
  • Requires:
    • Wood (15)
    • Stone (15)
    • Earth Crystal (1)
    • Copper Bar (1)
    • Wood (15)

Bee House – Place outside and wait for delicious honey! (Except in Winter).

  • Recipe – Farming Level 3
  • Requires:
    • Wood (40)
    • Coal (8)
    • Iron Bar (1)

Tapper – Place on a maple, oak, pine or palm tree and wait for the reservoir to fill with product!

  • Recipe – Foraging Level 3
  • Requires:

Preserves Jar – Turns vegetables into pickles and fruit into jam.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 4
  • Requires:
    • Wood (50)
    • Stone (40)
    • Coal (8)

Cheese Press – Turns milk into cheese.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 6
    • Wood (45)
    • Stone (45)
    • Hardwood (10)
    • Copper Bar (1)

Loom – Turns raw wool into fine cloth.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 7
  • Requires:
    • Wood.png Wood (60)
    • Fiber.png Fiber (30)
    • Pine Tar.png Pine Tar (1)

Keg – Put a fruit or vegetable in here. Eventually it will turn into a beverage.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 8
  • Requires:
    • Wood (30)
    • Clay (1)
    • Copper Bar (1)
    • Iron Bar (1)

Oil Maker – Makes gourmet truffle oil

  • Recipe – Farming Level 8
  • Requires:
    • Slime (50)
    • Hardwood (20)
    • Gold Bar (1)

Bombs

How to Craft All Items in Stardew Valley

Cherry Bomb – Generates a small explosion. Stand back!

  • Recipe – Mining Level 1
  • Requires:

Bomb – Generates an explosion. Watch out!

  • Recipe – Mining Level 6
  • Requires:

Mega Bomb – Generates an powerful explosion. Use with extreme caution.

  • Recipe – Mining Level 8
  • Requires:
    • Gold Ore (4)
    • Solar Essence (1)
    • Void Essence (1)

Explosive Ammo – Fire this with the slingshot.

  • Recipe – Combat Level 8
  • Requires:

Consumables in Stardew Valley

Field Snack – A quick snack to fuel the hungry forager.

  • Recipe – Foraging Level 1
  • Requires:
    • Acorn (1)
    • Maple Seed (1)
    • Pine Cone (1)

Life Elixir – Restores health to full.

  • Recipe – Combat Level 2
  • Requires:
    • Red Mushroom (1)
    • Purple Mushroom (1)
    • Morel (1)
    • Chanterelle (1)

Oil of Garlic – Drink this and weaker monsters will avoid you.

  • Recipe – Combat Level 6
  • Requires:

Decorations in Stardew Valley

Wood Floor – Place on the ground to create paths or spruce up your floors.

  • Recipe – Carpenter’s Shop

Straw Floor – Place on the ground to create paths or spruce up your floors.

  • Recipe – Carpenter’s Shop

Weathered Floor – Place on the ground to create paths or spruce up your floors.

  • Recipe – None

Crystal Floor – Place on the ground to create paths or spruce up your floors.

  • Recipe – Krobus

Stone Floor – Place on the ground to create paths or spruce up your floors.

  • Recipe – Carpenter’s Shop

Wood Path – Place on the ground to create paths or spruce up your floors.

  • Recipe – None

Gravel Path – Place on the ground to create paths or spruce up your floors.

  • Recipe – None

Cobblestone Path – Place on the ground to create paths or spruce up your floors.

  • Recipe – None

Stepping Stone Path – Place on the ground to create paths or spruce up your floors.

  • Recipe – Carpenter’s Shop

Crystal Path – Place on the ground to create paths or spruce up your floors.

  • Recipe – Carpenter’s Shop

Jack-O-Lantern – A whimsical fall decoration.

  • Recipe – Spirit’s Eve

Wicked Statue – There’s something unsettling about the looks of this statue.

  • Recipe – Krobus

Flute Block – Plays a flute sound when you walk past.

  • Recipe – Robin (Hearts Event)
    • Wood (10)
    • Copper Ore (2)
    • Fiber (20)

Drum Block – Plays a drum sound when you walk past.

  • Recipe – Robin (Hearts Event)
    • Stone (10)
    • Copper Ore (2)
    • Fiber (20)

Fences in Stardew Valley

Gate – Allows you to pass through a fence. (100 days)

Wood Fence – Keeps grass and animals contained! (23 to 33 days)

Stone Fence – Lasts longer than a wood fence. (55 to 66 days)

  • Recipe – Farming Level 2

Iron Fence – Lasts longer than a stone fence. (120 to 132 days)

  • Recipe – Farming Level 4

Hardwood Fence – The most durable type of fence. Takes an average of a year before degrading.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 6

Fertilizer

Basic Fertilizer – Improves soil quality a little, increasing your chance to grow quality crops. Mix into tilled soil.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 1

Speed-Gro – Stimulates leaf production. Guaranteed to increase growth rate by at least 10%. Mix into tilled soil.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 3

Basic Retaining Soil – This soil has a chance of staying watered overnight. Mix into tilled soil.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 4

Quality Retaining Soil – This soil has a good chance of staying watered overnight. Mix into tilled soil.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 7

Deluxe Speed-Gro – Stimulates leaf production. Guaranteed to increase growth rate by at least 25%. Mix into tilled soil.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 8

Quality Fertilizer – Improves soil quality, increasing your chance to grow quality crops. Mix into tilled soil.

  • Recipe -Farming Level 9

Fishing

Bait (5) – Used with Fiberglass/Iridium fishing rods. Causes fish to bite faster

  • Recipe – Fishing Level 2
  • Bug Meat (1)

Wild Bait (5) – Use with Fiberglass/Iridium fishing rods. Appeals to all fish.

  • Recipe – Linus (Heart Event)
    • Fiber (10)
    • Bug Meat (5)
    • Slime (5)

Crab Pot – Used with bait to capture crabs and other sea creatures.

  • Recipe – Fishing Level 3

Spinner – The shape makes it spin around in the water. Slightly increases the bite-rate when fishing.

  • Recipe – Fishing Level 6

Trap Bobber – Causes fish to escape slower when you aren’t reeling them in.

  • Recipe – Fishing Level 6

Cork Bobber – Slightly increases the size of your “fishing bar.”

  • Recipe – Fishing Level 7
    • Wood (10)
    • Hardwood (5)
    • Slime (10)

Treasure Hunter – Fish don’t escape while collecting treasures. Also slightly increases the chance to find treasures.

  • Recipe – Fishing Level 7

Dressed Spinner – The metal tab and colorful streamers create an enticing spectacle for fish. Increases the bite-rate when fishing.

  • Recipe – Fishing Level 8

Barbed Hook – Makes your catch more secure, causing the “fishing bar” to cling to your catch. Works best on slow, weak fish.

  • Recipe – Fishing Level 8

Magnet – Increases the chance of finding treasures when fishing. However, fish aren’t crazy about the taste.

  • Recipe – Fishing Level 9

Lighting

Torch – Provides a modest amount of light.

  • Recipe – None

Campfire – Provides a moderate amount of light.

  • Recipe – None
    • Stone (10)
    • Wood (10)
    • Fiber (10)

Wooden Brazier – Provides a moderate amount of light.

  • Recipe – Robin
    • Wood (10)
    • Coal (1)
    • Fiber (5)

Stone Brazier – Provides a moderate amount of light.

  • Recipe – Robin
    • Stone (10)
    • Coal (1)
    • Fiber (5)

Gold Brazier – Provides a moderate amount of light.

  • Recipe – Robin
    • Gold Bar (1)
    • Coal (1)
    • Fiber (5)

Carved Brazier – Provides a moderate amount of light.

  • Recipe – Robin

Stump Brazier – Provides a moderate amount of light.

  • Recipe – Robin

Barrel Brazier – Provides a moderate amount of light.

  • Recipe – Robin
    • Wood (50)
    • Solar Essence (1)
    • Coal (1)

Skull Brazier – Provides a moderate amount of light.

  • Recipe – Robin
    • Hardwood (10)
    • Solar Essence (1)
    • Coal (1)

Marble Brazier – Provides a moderate amount of light.

  • Recipe – Robin
    • Marble (1)
    • Aquamarine (1)
    • Stone (100)

Wood Lamp-post – Provides a good amount of light.

  • Recipe – Robin
    • Wood (50)
    • Battery Pack (1)

Iron Lamp-post – Provides a good amount of light.

  • Recipe – Robin
    • Iron Bar (1)
    • Battery Pack (1)

Seeds

How to Craft All Items in Stardew Valley

Wild Seeds (Sp) – An assortment of wild spring seeds.

  • Recipe – Foraging Level 1
    • Wild Horseradish (1)
    • Daffodil (1)
    • Leek (1)
    • Dandelion (1)

Wild Seeds (Su) – An assortment of wild summer seeds.

  • Recipe – Foraging Level 4
    • Spice Berry (1)
    • Grape (1)
    • Sweet Pea (1)

Wild Seeds (Fa) – An assortment of wild fall seeds.

  • Recipe – Foraging Level 6
    • Common Mushroom (1)
    • Wild Plum (1)
    • Hazelnut (1)
    • Blackberry (1)

Wild Seeds (Wi) – An assortment of wild winter seeds.

  • Recipe – Foraging Level 7
    • Winter Root (1)
    • Crystal Fruit (1)
    • Snow Yam (1)
    • Crocus (1)

Ancient Seeds – Could these still grow?

Sprinklers

How to Craft All Items in Stardew Valley

Sprinkler – Waters the 4 adjacent tiles every morning.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 3
    • Copper Bar (1)
    • Iron Bar (1)

Quality Sprinkler – Waters the 8 adjacent tiles every morning.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 6
    • Iron Bar (1)
    • Gold Bar (1)
    • Refined Quartz (1)

Iridium Sprinkler – Waters the 24 adjacent tiles every morning.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 9
    • Gold Bar (1)
    • Iridium Bar (1)
    • Battery Pack (1)

Rings

How to Craft All Items in Stardew Valley

Sturdy Ring – Cuts the duration of negative status effects in half

  • Recipe – Combat Level 1
    • Copper Bar (10)
    • Refined Quartz (5)
    • Earth Crystal (10)

Warrior Ring – Occasionally infuses the wearer with “warrior energy” after slaying a monster.

  • Recipe – Combat Level 4
    • Iron Bar (10)
    • Coal (25)
    • Frozen Tear (10)

Ring of Yoba – Occasionally shields the wearer from damage.

  • Recipe – Combat Level 7
    • Gold Bar (5)
    • Iron Bar (5)
    • Diamond (1)

Iridium Band – Glows, attracts items, and increases attack damage by 10%.

  • Recipe – Combat Level 9
    • Iridium Bar (5)
    • Solar Essence (50)
    • Void Essence (50)

Miscellaneous

How to Craft All Items in Stardew Valley

Chest – Holds up to 30 different Items

  • Recipe – After first entering the mines.

Furnace – Turns ore and coal into metal bars.

  • Recipe – After first entering the mines.
    • Copper Ore (20)
    • Stone (25)

Scarecrow – Prevents crows from eating crops in an area around the scarecrow

  • Recipe – Farming Level 1
    • Wood (50)
    • Coal (1)
    • Fiber (20)

Seed Maker – Place crops inside to produce a varying amount of seeds. Doesn’t work with fruit tree crops.

  • Recipe – Farming Level 9
    • Wood (25)
    • Coal (10)
    • Gold Bar (1)

Staircase – Use this to move down a level in the mines.

  • Recipe – Mining Level 2

Crystalarium – Insert a gem of your choice and it will grow copies.

  • Recipe – Mining Level 9
    • Stone (99)
    • Gold Bar (5)
    • Iridium Bar (2)
    • Battery Pack (1)

Charcoal Kiln – Turns 20 pieces of wood into one piece of coal.

  • Recipe – Foraging Level 4

Lightning Rod – Collects energy from lightning storms and turns it into battery packs

  • Recipe – Foraging Level 6
    • Iron Bar (1)
    • Refined Quartz (1)
    • Bat Wing (5)

Recycling Machine – Turns fishing trash into resources.

  • Recipe – Fishing Level 4
    • Wood (25)
    • Stone (25)
    • Iron Bar (1)

Worm Bin – Produces bait on a regular basis. The worms are self-sufficient.

  • Recipe – Fishing Level 8
    • Hardwood (25)
    • Gold Bar (1)
    • Iron Bar (1)
    • Fiber (50)

Slime Egg – Press Compresses 100 pieces of slime into a slime egg. It’s a miracle of science!

  • Recipe – Combat Level 6
    • Coal (25)
    • Fire Quartz (1)
    • Battery Pack (1)

Slime Incubator – Hatches slime eggs into slimes. Allows you to raise slimes outdoors.

  • Recipe – Combat Level 8
    • Iridium Bar (2)
    • Slime (100)

Warp Totem: Beach – Warp directly to the beach. Consumed on use.

  • Recipe – Foraging Level 6
    • Hardwood (1)
    • Coral (2)
    • Fiber (10)

Warp Totem: Mountains – Warp directly to the mountains. Consumed on use.

  • Recipe – Foraging Level 7
    • Hardwood (1)
    • Iron Bar (1)
    • Stone (25)

Warp Totem: Farm – Warp directly to your house. Consumed on use.

  • Recipe – Foraging Level 8
    • Hardwood (1)
    • Honey (1)
    • Fiber (20)

Rain Totem – Activate to greatly increase the chance for rain tomorrow. Consumed on use.

  • Recipe – Foraging Level 9
    • Hardwood (1)
    • Truffle Oil (1)
    • Pine Tar (5)

stardew valley how to craft more things

WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: How To Check What Items You Have Crafted - Craft Master Achievement - Stardew Valley

Once you've stockpiled a bit of wood, go into your crafting menu. For 50 wood, you can build a chest (and a bunch of other things too — get.

stardew valley how to craft more things
Written by Nabar
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